A story in Sunday editions of The Post incorrectly identified a demonstrator who was protesting Lt. Gov. Charles S. Robb's appearance at the 100th anniversary celebration of the Old Dominion Boat Club in Alexandria. Kathy Wilson should have been identified as first national vice chairwoman of the National Women's Political Caucus.

An angry group of 150 protesters turned Virginia Lt. Gov. Charles S. (Chuck) Robb's speech to members of an all-white, all-male boat club in Alexandria yesterday into a rowdy shouting match that left Robb shaken.

No sooner had Robb, guarded by two detectives, mounted the podium in front of the Old Dominion Boat Club than the chants and taunts from feminists and others began. They continued throughout his talk, forcing Robb to abandon his prepared speech and deal with charges he had deserted his positions on civil rights and women's issues.

"Does Lynda know you're here, Chuck?" the protesters chanted at one point, referring to Robb's wife, the former Lynda Bird Johnson, who heads President Carter's Advisory Committee on Women.

"Yes, she knows I'm here," Robb shot back. "She's very proud of the fact that I'm following through with this. My wife and daughters even lined up to kiss me before I came."

Robb, who is almost certain to be Virginia's Democratic gubenatorial candidate next year, had persisted in his plans to speak to the boat club's 100th anniversary celebration yesterday despite warnings that his appearance would anger many blacks and women in Northern Virginia.

Judged by his own announced policy of trying to avoid controversy, Robb's appearance yesterday was a political disaster. A McLean lawyer, Robb was clearly upset by the confrontation, telling the protesters they were picking on a friend. Robb said he alone among elected state officials had been willing to testify for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment in a hostile Virginia legislature.

He also made a point of telling the protesters that his wife, the daughter of the late President Johnson, had been "genuinely hurt when you decided to unleash this (protest) on me."

"I've never seen Chuck express any emotion before," said Patricia Winton Goodman, Virginia coordinator of the National Organization for Women, one of the protesting groups.

Members of the boat club, located at the foot of the King Street in Old Town Alexandria were equally outraged by the protest.

"This whole thing is a put-up job to get publicity for the ERA, fumed Stafford Kelley, about club supporters." It's not appropriate for them to disrupt the ceremony," agreed his wife, standing alongside him at the outside event.

"It's just Mickey Mouse," said Ron Evans of the White Rocks Yacht Club. "That says it all."

Robb defended his presence, saying that he didn't think any politician "should cave in to threats and intimidation." He closed his 10-minite speech by wishing the club "good luck and Godspeed." But he was almost instantly surrounded by demonstrators who demanded a "dialogue" with him.

Robb looked surprised. "I could have sworn we just did that," he said.

The boat club, the state's oldest such organization, incurred the wrath of feminists last April by rejecting a prominent Alexandria business woman's application for membership and then expelling the two club members who had sponsored her application.

Robb said that when he agreed to be keynote speaker at the club's 100th anniversary he was unaware of that or that his appearance would cause a protest. Rep. Herbert E. Harriss II, a Democrat who represents Alexandria, and Mayor Charles E. Beatley both refused to attend yesterday's event, citing the club's membership policies.

Robb said that when he agreed to be keynote speaker at the club's 100th anniversary he was unaware of that or that his appearance would cause a protest. Rep. Herbert E. Harriss II, a Democrat who represents Alexandria, and Mayor Charles E. Beatley both refused to attend yesterday's event, citing the club's membership policies.

But Robb said he would come because he had a policy of speaking to all groups in the state regardless of their policies.

"We know Chuck Robb is pro-ERA and prowomen's rights," said 26-year-old David Abrams of Alexandria. "But his appearance here is an uncaring gesture. We just want him to know that we aren't going to forget it."

Kathy Wilson, the first national vice-chairwoman of the National Organization for Women, said "We're concerned about Chuck Robb's soul and we're here to chide him a bit. This club is nothing but a living symbol of inequality."

"His speech was an attack on us in my view," said Mary Beth Shaw of the National Women's Political Caucus. "I don't think he knows what we speak for. This is an old line, discriminatory Virginia club here."

Club members Stephen H. Davis, the master of ceremonies, thanked Robb for appearing and said over hecklers that "We've suffered through a lot of adversities," including two World Wars and several fires at the clubhouse. He did not mention the flap over its membership policies.

Robb did not comment directly on the club's policies either, but said that he opposed groups "like the American Nazi Party and the KKK that espouse hatred and discrimination."

"I think you know where I stand on the issues or you wouldn't be here today," Robb said, cutting short planned statements on the Alexandria waterfront and national defense, to deal with the protesters.

Robb then mentioned a release on the demonstration that had been mailed to his home, adding, to the delight of the club's supporters, that he "had to tape it up to read it because one of my daughters had ripped it up."

"What do boats, Chuck Robb, and discrimination have in common?" Robb said, reading from the release. "That's pretty heavy. I was the only statewide elected official willing to testify for the ERA."

Robb was repeatedly drowned out by several National Airport jets, chants of "What do we want? ERA! When do we want it? NOW!," and loud retorts from frustrated club members perched on a balcony above him.

"Get them out of here!" the club members shouted to a group of Alexandria policemen assigned to watch over the demonstrators.

"This just isn't necessary," said club member Arthur Sid, 43. "They're invading my rights and principles as much as anything else. I'm with the Coast Guard auxiliary, work with Boy Scouts. I'm a patriotic American, not a bigoted racist."

Robb said that he was shocked by the "polarization" generated by the event. "It just never occured to me," Robb said, admitting that had he known, he probably would have declined the invitation to speak. "I think that if you (club members) had known you wouldn't have asked me."