In the triumphant afterglow of his biggest raid in two years, the Maryland Censor Board's chief inspector threaded film through reel after reel today as fast as his fingers could work. Just outside his projection room the censors themselves and four vice squad detectives spent the afternoon viewing offending scenes in scores of pornographic peep shows while furiously scribbling notes on long yellow legal pads.

"The raids went down like clockwork," said the unlikely looking inspector, Francis Pollard, a pudgy figure in wire-rimmed spectacles and alpine crew neck who resembles a youngish Mr. Magoo.

For an agency that has spent much of its recent history fending off the ridicule of liberals and other nonbelievers it was a rare moment of triumph. After a long and controversial history the board is all but certain to go out of existence this year, but that did not prevent its inspectors from joining with police in raiding seven peep show parlors here and around the state on Monday and confiscating nearly 600 unlicensed peep shows from their 25-cent-a-peep movie booths.

Board Vice Chairman Martha Wright, an actress and born-again Christian, viewed the film today with emotions akin to horror, but said the sweeping raids might be the salvation of the censor board -- the only statewide censorship board in the nation. It is scheduled to die this June under Maryland's so-called sunset law, unless the state legislature votes to keep it alive.

"I feel once they [the legislators] see what we're doing, they will not get rid of us," said Wright, who believes that the porn peddlers "are waiting at our borders" to strike if the censor board is abolished.

And so Wright and the board's most notorious member, 70-year-old Mary Avara, who has dubbed herself the "X-rated grandma" of censorship, spent the day watching as films like "Pretty Girls," "On the Road," and "Organized for Action" flickered before them on not one, but two, film projection screens. Board members may have to identify the films, if they are called to testify when store employes are brought to court on charges of showing unlicensed movies.

But as Avara and Wright watched, 18 blocks north of their offices in downtown Baltimore, a new set of "peeps" was already flickering on other screens -- in the little booths at Video World, the scene of one of Monday's raids.

Inspector Pollard and Baltimore vice squad detectives had burst into Video World, armed with a search and seizure warrant, at 11 a.m. Monday, and when employes refused to turn over the films, they crowbarred their way into the film projection boxes and carted away the merchandise.

That apparently didn't slow down Video World. Today, the sound of quarters being fed into the peep machines in dark little booths at the back of the shop could be heard every few seconds.

"We never even shut down, not for a minute," said a man in a cap and shades, who said he had no name and "nothing to do with the business."

But the fact that the "peeps" were on again did not seen to faze Wright, Avara and company. They could talk only of the incredible number of films that had been taken off the screens in Hagerstown, Edgewood, Aberdeen and Baltimore in the sweeping raids.

Despite its staff's loyalty, the censor board has been a perennial target for liberal legislators and the movie industry.

The board always survived unscathed until last year when sunset laws required a majority vote in the legislature to keep it alive. Despite an impassioned plea by Avara, opponents in the Senate kept it from getting that majority.

Still, while the board remains in existence, every film shown in Maryland must bear its seal. Unlicensed films may be confiscated and their exhibitors fined up to $500. Wright said "there is no way" that peep shows would ever gain the seal, and every so often the board conducts raids to get them off the streets.

Today Wright viewed the films with a sense of price that "Maryland is leading the United States in having its integrity to fight obscenity."

And uptown at the Book Nook, which was raided Monday, an employe said that raids and fines are just part of the business. "Sure, the city will collect a little revenue along the way. We figure it's a business expense, and then everybody goes back to what they were doing the next day."