About 100 stockholders in a local company seeking Fairfax County's potentially lucrative cable television franchise jammed a Board of Supervisors meeting yesterday as the firm's officers bitterly challenged a county report endorsing a competitor.

The president of Fairfax Telecommunications Co., which counts top county Democrats and Republicans among its investors, said the turnout demonstrated his company's broad community support. Several supervisors said they believed the stockholders' appearance was intended to sway their votes next month on the cable franchise, which a consultant has estimated could be worth as much as $260 million in 15 years.

"I was annoyed to see the 'rent-a-citizens' in the room," said Democratic Supervisor Sandra L. Duckworth.

"This is a tough enough decision without having to worry whether your friends are sitting in the audience," said Republican Supervisor Marie B. Travesky.

Fairfax Telecommunications, a partnership between a large, Colorado-based cable firm and more than 200 local investors, is competing for the franchise against Media General Cable of Fairfax Co., a subsidiary of the communications company that owns Richmond's daily newspapers. A county staff report, released Friday, called Media General better qualified, but the county's $24,000 cable TV consultant declined, in a separate report, to say which company submitted the better proposal.

The supervisors, who are scheduled to award the franchise June 28 after more than three years of study and debate, said yesterday they do not know which company they will pick, although several said they are leaning toward Media General.

L. Gary Byrd, president of Fairfax Telecommunications, charged the staff report is biased, inaccurate and fails to give enough weight to his firm's engineering plan, which both evaluations acknowledged was superior to Media General's.

"Our competition hasn't even come up with a system so they can be compared, and yet that basic fact has been glossed over," said Byrd, an engineer and past president of the Fairfax Chamber of Commerce. "I'm not completely sanguine about this whole process."

Byrd also disputed the staff's contention that the local stockholders have had to pay only a fraction of the true value of their shares in the cable firms. "That's a lie," Byrd said.

The consultant said that the local stockholders will get a 51 percent interest in Byrd's firm after investing 2 percent of the firm's needed cash. The stockholders could receive as much as $54.5 million during the next 15 years for their $1 million investment. The investors include Democratic state Sen. Adelard L. Brault, former Virginia state attorney general Andrew P. Miller of Alexandria, Democratic county chairwoman Dottie P. Schick and--as of last week--former Republican county chairman William J. Olson.

Byrd said that the politicians are in the minority among his company's stockholders. "I think you'll find that FTC is very representative of the broad community," Byrd said.

Media General has five local stockholders, mostly from the influential local developer community, who will also receive more stock than they pay for, according to the consultant and staff.

Board Chairman John F. Herrity and several other supervisors said they are concerned whether the parent companies of either bidder will stand behind the promises of their subsidiaries.

"We've had two experiences in this metropolitan area, one in Alexandria and one in Arlington, and neither was able to do what they said they would do in terms of building the system they promised to build," Herrity said. "If everything's economically fine, the parent company keeps pouring money in. If things are bad, they bug out." Local Cable Firm's Investors Press Fairfax Board for Franchise -6------------------------------------------------------------ By Fred Hiatt Washington Post Staff Writer

About 100 stockholders in a local company seeking Fairfax County's potentially lucrative cable television franchise jammed a Board of Supervisors meeting yesterday as the firm's officers bitterly challenged a county report endorsing a competitor.

The president of Fairfax Telecommunications Co., which counts top county Democrats and Republicans among its investors, said the turnout demonstrated his company's broad community support. Several supervisors said they believed the stockholders' appearance was intended to sway their votes next month on the cable franchise, which a consultant has estimated could be worth as much as $260 million in 15 years.

"I was annoyed to see the 'rent-a-citizens' in the room," said Democratic Supervisor Sandra L. Duckworth.

"This is a tough enough decision without having to worry whether your friends are sitting in the audience," said Republican Supervisor Marie B. Travesky.

Fairfax Telecommunications, a partnership between a large, Colorado-based cable firm and more than 200 local investors, is competing for the franchise against Media General Cable of Fairfax Co., a subsidiary of the communications company that owns Richmond's daily newspapers. A county staff report, released Friday, called Media General better qualified, but the county's $24,000 cable TV consultant declined, in a separate report, to say which company submitted the better proposal.

The supervisors, who are scheduled to award the franchise June 28 after more than three years of study and debate, said yesterday they do not know which company they will pick, although several said they are leaning toward Media General.

L. Gary Byrd, president of Fairfax Telecommunications, charged the staff report is biased, inaccurate and fails to give enough weight to his firm's engineering plan, which both evaluations acknowledged was superior to Media General's.

"Our competition hasn't even come up with a system so they can be compared, and yet that basic fact has been glossed over," said Byrd, an engineer and past president of the Fairfax Chamber of Commerce. "I'm not completely sanguine about this whole process."

Byrd also disputed the staff's contention that the local stockholders have had to pay only a fraction of the true value of their shares in the cable firms. "That's a lie," Byrd said.

The consultant said that the local stockholders will get a 51 percent interest in Byrd's firm after investing 2 percent of the firm's needed cash. The stockholders could receive as much as $54.5 million during the next 15 years for their $1 million investment. The investors include Democratic state Sen. Adelard L. Brault, former Virginia state attorney general Andrew P. Miller of Alexandria, Democratic county chairwoman Dottie P. Schick and--as of last week--former Republican county chairman William J. Olson.

Byrd said that the politicians are in the minority among his company's stockholders. "I think you'll find that FTC is very representative of the broad community," Byrd said.

Media General has five local stockholders, mostly from the influential local developer community, who will also receive more stock than they pay for, according to the consultant and staff.

Board Chairman John F. Herrity and several other supervisors said they are concerned whether the parent companies of either bidder will stand behind the promises of their subsidiaries.

"We've had two experiences in this metropolitan area, one in Alexandria and one in Arlington, and neither was able to do what they said they would do in terms of building the system they promised to build," Herrity said. "If everything's economically fine, the parent company keeps pouring money in. If things are bad, they bug out."