The Prince George's County Board of Education voted last night to try to restore 150 teaching positions lost as a result of last year's huge budget cut.

The vote came after the board decided to shift a total of $3 million from certain reserve accounts, gasoline and utility cost estimates and employe benefit areas to cover the cost of increasing the number of teaching positions and reducing class size.

The 507 teachers laid off last July will have first call on the new positions, according to school spokesman Brian J. Porter--if the budget proposed by School Superintendent Edward J. Feeney, which now totals $316.9 million, can be funded intact.

The amount that will be available for the schools is in question because County Executive Parris Glendening has warned that he expects revenues will fall $38 million short of county needs unless new sources of funds are found.

School budget officials came up with a total of $3.6 million, largely through a change in accounting for the cost of teacher terminal leave pay and revisions of other estimates made since the budget was released Dec. 16. The board was unanimous in seeking to rehire teachers with $3 million of that amount in order to reduce average class size, which rose this year from 28.3 to 30.3 students in elementary schools and 27.3 to 28.5 in secondary schools.

The uncertainty about funding made board members reluctant to consider allocating the remaining $600,000. "The man Glendening has already said, 'I do not have any guarantee that the money is coming through,' " board member Bonnie Johns said.

"We are not talking about money we have," said Board Chairman Susan Bieniasz. "We're talking about a request."

In a further effort to lower the increases in class size, board member Angelo Castelli asked the board to consider eliminating elementary school gym classes and substituting a 15-minute excercise period to be conducted by the regular classroom teacher. School staff estimated the move would save enough money to rehire 118 teachers, but said the change would place a hardship on classroom teachers.

"The relief provided by the music and physical education teacher is the one break that some of these teachers have," assistant school superintendent Edward Felegy told the board, and the Castelli motion was not voted on. P.G. School Board Votes To Restore 150 Jobs By Leon Wynter Washington Post Staff Writer

The Prince George's County Board of Education voted last night to try to restore 150 teaching positions lost as a result of last year's huge budget cut.

The vote came after the board decided to shift a total of $3 million from certain reserve accounts, gasoline and utility cost estimates and employe benefit areas to cover the cost of increasing the number of teaching positions and reducing class size.

The 507 teachers laid off last July will have first call on the new positions, according to school spokesman Brian J. Porter--if the budget proposed by School Superintendent Edward J. Feeney, which now totals $316.9 million, can be funded intact.

The amount that will be available for the schools is in question because County Executive Parris Glendening has warned that he expects revenues will fall $38 million short of county needs unless new sources of funds are found.

School budget officials came up with a total of $3.6 million, largely through a change in accounting for the cost of teacher terminal leave pay and revisions of other estimates made since the budget was released Dec. 16. The board was unanimous in seeking to rehire teachers with $3 million of that amount in order to reduce average class size, which rose this year from 28.3 to 30.3 students in elementary schools and 27.3 to 28.5 in secondary schools.

The uncertainty about funding made board members reluctant to consider allocating the remaining $600,000. "The man Glendening has already said, 'I do not have any guarantee that the money is coming through,' " board member Bonnie Johns said.

"We are not talking about money we have," said Board Chairman Susan Bieniasz. "We're talking about a request."

In a further effort to lower the increases in class size, board member Angelo Castelli asked the board to consider eliminating elementary school gym classes and substituting a 15-minute excercise period to be conducted by the regular classroom teacher. School staff estimated the move would save enough money to rehire 118 teachers, but said the change would place a hardship on classroom teachers.

"The relief provided by the music and physical education teacher is the one break that some of these teachers have," assistant school superintendent Edward Felegy told the board, and the Castelli motion was not voted on.