Prince George's County has reached a tentative contract agreement with the police union that would give officers no cost-of-living raises next year but would guarantee that they will not be laid off because of the county's financial difficulties.

The agreement was announced yesterday by County Executive Parris Glendening at a joint w0064 ----- r d BC-04/19/83-PACT 04-19 0001 Reduction in Work Week No-Raise, No-Layoff Pact Accepted for P.G. Police By Leon Wynter Washington Post Staff Writer

Prince George's County has reached a tentative contract agreement with the police union that would give officers no cost-of-living raises next year but would guarantee that they will not be laid off because of the county's financial difficulties.

The agreement was announced yesterday by County Executive Parris Glendening at a joint press conference with Mal Curran, head of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 89.

The two-year contract, which would also reduce the police work week from 42 to 40 hours and permit salary negotiations in the second year, now goes to the union, which has more than 800 members, for a ratification vote.

In March Glendening announced a policy eliminating all cost-of-living raises for county employes, most of whom are unionized, due to a projected shortfall in the budget for fiscal 1984, which begins July 1. The police contract is the first of several under negotiation to reach tentative settlement. Glendening hopes the others also will provide for no raises.

At yesterday's news conference, Glendening praised "the officers and employes who are making a sacrifice."

Curran praised Glendening and the county's negotiating posture, which he characterized as conciliatory and amicable, as an improvement from the previous administration under then county executive Lawrence J. Hogan. Not since the county's labor code went into effect in 1973 has a police contract been settled while an existing contract was still in force. The current police contract expires June 30.

Curran, as chief negotiator for the police union, said he was forced to choose between cost-of-living raises and layoffs and blamed TRIM, the county charter amendment that places an absolute limit on property tax revenues.

"It was a very difficult contract to negotiate. The officers of this county cannot be expected to go two years without a pay raise-TRIM must be ammended just as soon as the voters can ammend it," Curran said.

The county police and firemen won the right to binding arbitration after passage of a 1980 ballot question, but Curran said there was no benefit in calling for arbitration this year.

The difference in police manpower due to the two-hour cut in work week will be made up during the overlap between shifts, Curran said. About 80 to 90 officers are on patrol during a given shift, Curran said. The three shifts currently have an overlap of about an hour when about 180 officers are technically on duty. The overlap period will be reduced to a half hour, said Curran, who feels that the police department is undermanned.

"The majority of the people do not call the police each year, therefore they are not aware that the service is as poor as it is," Curran said.