A U.S. District Court judge yesterday reduced the $500,000 bond set for one of two men indicted on charges of operating a cocaine distribution ring on Capitol Hill after the man's father, a prominent Washington lawyer, made an impassioned plea for the reduction.

Judge Thomas F. Hogan permitted Washington lawyer Sylvan Marshall to pledge his $418,000 home in Northwest Washington along with $50,000 in cash as bond to secure the release of Marshall's 27-year-old son, Douglas.

Hogan's action means that it is likely that the younger Marshall, indicted last November with Troy M. Todd, 27, on charges of operating a cocaine distribution ring, will be released today or Friday from D.C. Jail, where he has been held since his return here from Australia on Sunday.

The action does not affect Todd.

The arrests of both men a year ago sparked investigations by the Justice Department and the House ethics committee into alleged drug use by members of Congress or their staffs on Capitol Hill. Marshall and Todd left the country in May before their indictment on the charges. They were arrested in January in Australia, where they had been living under false identities, and were extradited from there last week.

At the hearing yesterday, Sylvan Marshall urged the judge to "accept the plea of a devoted father and mother" and release their son so that he would not have to stay in prison pending trial.

"Doug is not going to run," Marshall said. "He will never put us in jeopardy."

Marshall said he had contacted several bondsmen in this area and in New York in an attempt to get one of them to guarantee the $500,000 bond set by Hogan on Monday, but none would do so unless given a nonrefundable 10 percent deposit and the remainder in readily convertible assets. Marshall said he called family, friends and savings and loan institutions but could not raise that much money.

Douglas Marshall's lawyer, Jonathan Shapiro, told Hogan that under federal parole guidelines, his client would be eligible for parole within 24 to 36 months even if he were convicted of the drug charges. "That amount of time is not worth running from," Shapiro said. Bond Cut for Suspect In Hill Cocaine Ring After Father's Plea By Al Kamen Washington Post Staff Writer

A U.S. District Court judge yesterday reduced the $500,000 bond set for one of two men indicted on charges of operating a cocaine distribution ring on Capitol Hill after the man's father, a prominent Washington lawyer, made an impassioned plea for the reduction.

Judge Thomas F. Hogan permitted Washington lawyer Sylvan Marshall to pledge his $418,000 home in Northwest Washington along with $50,000 in cash as bond to secure the release of Marshall's 27-year-old son, Douglas.

Hogan's action means that it is likely that the younger Marshall, indicted last November with Troy M. Todd, 27, on charges of operating a cocaine distribution ring, will be released today or Friday from D.C. Jail, where he has been held since his return here from Australia on Sunday.

The action does not affect Todd.

The arrests of both men a year ago sparked investigations by the Justice Department and the House ethics committee into alleged drug use by members of Congress or their staffs on Capitol Hill. Marshall and Todd left the country in May before their indictment on the charges. They were arrested in January in Australia, where they had been living under false identities, and were extradited from there last week.

At the hearing yesterday, Sylvan Marshall urged the judge to "accept the plea of a devoted father and mother" and release their son so that he would not have to stay in prison pending trial.

"Doug is not going to run," Marshall said. "He will never put us in jeopardy."

Marshall said he had contacted several bondsmen in this area and in New York in an attempt to get one of them to guarantee the $500,000 bond set by Hogan on Monday, but none would do so unless given a nonrefundable 10 percent deposit and the remainder in readily convertible assets. Marshall said he called family, friends and savings and loan institutions but could not raise that much money.

Douglas Marshall's lawyer, Jonathan Shapiro, told Hogan that under federal parole guidelines, his client would be eligible for parole within 24 to 36 months even if he were convicted of the drug charges. "That amount of time is not worth running from," Shapiro said.