Alexandria city officials, angry over last week's endorsement by the Washington Metropolitan Council of Governments (COG) of a test that would subject more Northern Virginia residents to noise from jets using National Airport, are considering ways to block the plan.

"Planes are going to be allowed to go full engines ahead right off the airport runways," said Alexandria Vice Mayor James P. Moran Jr. "The test is going to make even more intolerable noise than we have had to bear so far."

The Federal Aviation Administration, which owns and operates National, is studying a so-called scatter plan that is designed to spread aircraft noise more evenly over the metropolitan area by, for the most part, changing flight paths to and from National. The test would last 60 to 90 days.

But an FAA spokesman said the agency is at still weeks away from making a decision on the controversial test that would subject an additional 320,000 area residents to aircraft noise.

Meanwhile, the Alexandria City Council has instructed its city attorney to study how the city could keep the FAA from carrying out the test if it decides to do so. "At this time I don't know what we can do," said City Attorney Cyril D. Calley. "I've been asked to investigate the matter and that's what I am going to do."

But council members Donald C. Casey Jr. and Margaret B. Inman said the city has a range of options. Inman, the city's COG representative, voted against the test.

Casey said the test will significantly increase the noise levels jets currently produce over the city, thus violating the city's 10-year-old noise ordinance. On those grounds, he said a lawsuit could be filed in federal court to stop the FAA.

"I don't think they have the authority to violate local law," he said. "There are a lot of things the federal government can do in the national interest, but running airplanes over Alexandria is not one of them."

Casey and Iman also challenge the FAA's recently completed assessment of the anticiapated effects of the scatter test, which concludes that Alexandria would be relatively unaffected by the proposed test.

Inman called the report "flawed" and said the test would create unacceptable noise levels and safety risks.

The scatter plan would cause jets to fly lower over heavily populated areas of Alexandria and Arlington because pilots would be permitted to make their turns near the Key Bridge and the Wilson Bridge instead of current routes that force jets farther upstream to the Cabin John Bridge and downstream below the Wilson Bridge.

"I think Alexandria accepts the fact that we will be one of the most severely impacted areas," said Inman. "But we can't bear any more noise." Alexandria Studies Way to Block Plan On Airport Noise By Michel Marriott Washington Post Staff Writer

Alexandria city officials, angry over last week's endorsement by the Washington Metropolitan Council of Governments (COG) of a test that would subject more Northern Virginia residents to noise from jets using National Airport, are considering ways to block the plan.

"Planes are going to be allowed to go full engines ahead right off the airport runways," said Alexandria Vice Mayor James P. Moran Jr. "The test is going to make even more intolerable noise than we have had to bear so far."

The Federal Aviation Administration, which owns and operates National, is studying a so-called scatter plan that is designed to spread aircraft noise more evenly over the metropolitan area by, for the most part, changing flight paths to and from National. The test would last 60 to 90 days.

But an FAA spokesman said the agency is at still weeks away from making a decision on the controversial test that would subject an additional 320,000 area residents to aircraft noise.

Meanwhile, the Alexandria City Council has instructed its city attorney to study how the city could keep the FAA from carrying out the test if it decides to do so. "At this time I don't know what we can do," said City Attorney Cyril D. Calley. "I've been asked to investigate the matter and that's what I am going to do."

But council members Donald C. Casey Jr. and Margaret B. Inman said the city has a range of options. Inman, the city's COG representative, voted against the test.

Casey said the test will significantly increase the noise levels jets currently produce over the city, thus violating the city's 10-year-old noise ordinance. On those grounds, he said a lawsuit could be filed in federal court to stop the FAA.

"I don't think they have the authority to violate local law," he said. "There are a lot of things the federal government can do in the national interest, but running airplanes over Alexandria is not one of them."

Casey and Iman also challenge the FAA's recently completed assessment of the anticiapated effects of the scatter test, which concludes that Alexandria would be relatively unaffected by the proposed test.

Inman called the report "flawed" and said the test would create unacceptable noise levels and safety risks.

The scatter plan would cause jets to fly lower over heavily populated areas of Alexandria and Arlington because pilots would be permitted to make their turns near the Key Bridge and the Wilson Bridge instead of current routes that force jets farther upstream to the Cabin John Bridge and downstream below the Wilson Bridge.

"I think Alexandria accepts the fact that we will be one of the most severely impacted ars," said Inman. "But we can't bear any more noise."