Since January, organizers of the March on Washington have revised a proposed foreign policy paper several times in an effort to reach an accommodation with Jewish groups that opposed certain statements concerning U.S. involvement in the Middle East. Final language on the subject is expected to be announced today. Following are several versions offered thus far:

* "We oppose the militarization of internal conflicts, often abetted and even encouraged by massive U.S. arms exports, in areas of the world such as the Middle East and Central America, while their basic human problems are neglected."--published in January as part of the official "call" or agenda of the "Jobs, Peace and Freedom" march.

* "After decades of hatred and bloodshed, it is clear that there can be no peace in the Middle East without a political resolution of the conflict among Israelis, Palestinians and the Arab states. . . . The U.S. should cease to be a partisan in the region and should adopt policies which are even-handed and use its considerable influence to achieve direct negotiations between Israel and the legitimate representatives of the Palestinians, including the PLO . . . "--part of a 2 1/2-page policy statement drawn up July 2 by the march's peace task force.

* "The Middle East is a barometer and acid test of our nation's foreign policy. . . . The U.S. should use its considerable influence to achieve direct negotiations between Israel and the legitimate representatives of the Palestinians, on a basis of mutual recognition and a commitment to peaceful co-existence. . . . The unilateral policy of shuttle diplomacy by the U.S. and the refusal even to talk to the PLO . . . should be discontinued."--part of a revised, two-page version drawn up at a meeting of the march co-chairs on July 30.

* "Among the organizations in our coalition, there are divergent views with regard to the Middle East. However, there is a general opposition to present United States policy and all recognize the Middle East as a barometer and acid test of our nation's foreign policy. . . . Towards this end the United States should have policies which contribute to a just and lasting peace for the Palestinians, the Israelis, and all other people in the Middle East and should encourage on-going constructive dialogue between these parties."--part of a two-paragraph revised version agreed to at a meeting of the co-chairs Aug. 7.

* The final version, according to march organizers, will delete the sentence saying there is general opposition to U.S. policy in the Middle East.