Among those who rushed to beat yesterday's voter registration deadline in Virginia were couples new to the area, individuals just turned 18, businessmen, teachers and at least one former secretary of state.

"Alexander Haig was here around 2:15," said Rose Durbin, an assistant Fairfax County registrar who worked throughout the day swearing in voters at a long table at the entrance of Hecht's in the Tysons Corner shopping mall.

"He asked me if he could vote four or five times," Durbin recalled. "I said, 'No. One man, one vote,' " she joked, adding, "He was only kidding."

Area residents, including Haig, who recently moved to McLean, flocked by the hundreds yesterday to voter registration booths set up throughout Northern Virginia at shopping malls, libraries, churches and grocery and convenience stores.

Maryland residents have until 9 p.m. Monday to register for the Nov. 6 presidential elections, and those in the District can sign up as late as Tuesday.

Virginia residents had until 5 p.m. yesterday to register, and elections officials, predicting a record number of voters this year, said they were swamped by last-minute applicants.

"The indications we're getting from our registrars across the state is that they're doing a booming business," state election official Audrey Piatt said yesterday.

In Fairfax County, registrar Lilyan Spero noted that a steady stream of last-minute registrants throughout the county was keeping elections officials on their toes.

"It started the week before Labor Day . . . and each week it's gotten larger," Spero said. Registration jumped from about 2,000 a week at the start of September to 7,000 last week, she said. Fairfax officials projected this year's total registration figures will surpass 1980's by 50,000 voters.

In Alexandria, officials reported no long lines at the city's 10 registration sites. "But you must remember, we've had several sites open all along so that we wouldn't have this terrible push," said election official Shirley Jones.

In Prince George's County, elections supervisor Margaret MacDonald predicted that 4,000 voters would be signed up yesterday, compared with 6,000 during all of last week. In Maryland, officials also noted that the gap between the numbers of registered Republicans and Democrats was closing with Democrats leading 3 to 1, compared with a 5-to-1 lead earlier this year.

At the registration sites, there was the typical torrent of excuses from last-minute registrants claiming everything from forgetfulness to long-established patterns of procrastination.

At Tysons, Daphne Jackson, 18, and Trang Gueron, who became a U.S. citizen this year, signed up yesterday. Dana Lee, a 29-year-old schoolteacher, registered also, confessing, "I'm a late person, what can I say?"

Deane and Carol Hillenbrand, who voted in Arlington in the 1980 election, finally transferred their registration to Fairfax yesterday, less than three hours shy of the deadline. "And, I've been working at the polls without being registered," said Carol Hillenbrand. Last Call Draws Crowds For Va. Voter Sign-Up By Leah Y. Latimer Washington Post Staff Writer

Among those who rushed to beat yesterday's voter registration deadline in Virginia were couples new to the area, individuals just turned 18, businessmen, teachers and at least one former secretary of state.

"Alexander Haig was here around 2:15," said Rose Durbin, an assistant Fairfax County registrar who worked throughout the day swearing in voters at a long table at the entrance of Hecht's in the Tysons Corner shopping mall.

"He asked me if he could vote four or five times," Durbin recalled. "I said, 'No. One man, one vote,' " she joked, adding, "He was only kidding."

Area residents, including Haig, who recently moved to McLean, flocked by the hundreds yesterday to voter registration booths set up throughout Northern Virginia at shopping malls, libraries, churches and grocery and convenience stores.

Maryland residents have until 9 p.m. Monday to register for the Nov. 6 presidential elections, and those in the District can sign up as late as Tuesday.

Virginia residents had until 5 p.m. yesterday to register, and elections officials, predicting a record number of voters this year, said they were swamped by last-minute applicants.

"The indications we're getting from our registrars across the state is that they're doing a booming business," state election official Audrey Piatt said yesterday.

In Fairfax County, registrar Lilyan Spero noted that a steady stream of last-minute registrants throughout the county was keeping elections officials on their toes.

"It started the week before Labor Day . . . and each week it's gotten larger," Spero said. Registration jumped from about 2,000 a week at the start of September to 7,000 last week, she said. Fairfax officials projected this year's total registration figures will surpass 1980's by 50,000 voters.

In Alexandria, officials reported no long lines at the city's 10 registration sites. "But you must remember, we've had several sites open all along so that we wouldn't have this terrible push," said election official Shirley Jones.

In Prince George's County, elections supervisor Margaret MacDonald predicted that 4,000 voters would be signed up yesterday, compared with 6,000 during all of last week. In Maryland, officials also noted that the gap between the numbers of registered Republicans and Democrats was closing with Democrats leading 3 to 1, compared with a 5-to-1 lead earlier this year.

At the registration sites, there was the typical torrent of excuses from last-minute registrants claiming everything from forgetfulness to long-established patterns of procrastination.

At Tysons, Daphne Jackson, 18, and Trang Gueron, who became a U.S. citizen this year, signed up yesterday. Dana Lee, a 29-year-old schoolteacher, registered also, confessing, "I'm a late person, what can I say?"

Deane and Carol Hillenbrand, who voted in Arlington in the 1980 election, finally transferred their registration to Fairfax yesterday, less than three hours shy of the deadline. "And, I've been working at the polls without being registered," said Carol Hillenbrand.