The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors agreed yesterday to formulate a bond issue proposal for voters in November that could channel up to $80 million to county road improvements, including a start on construction of the Springfield Bypass.

The 6-to-0 vote was possible because of a bill passed in the just-ended 1985 session of the Virginia General Assembly to allow greater borrowing power for localities to fund road improvements.

Board members said they hoped to develop a package of highway projects that could be "fast-tracked" -- pushed through the Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation more quickly than usual.

Chief among the projects, board members said, would be the Springfield Bypass, a $200 million, 35-mile highway that would eventually connect Rte. 7 in the county's northwest with I-95 in the southeast, acting as a parallel, "outer" Beltway. Fairfax transportation officials have long said that the bypass would ease traffic congestion throughout the fast-growing county.

County Board of Supervisors Chairman John F. Herrity, who introduced the resolution for a referendum, said that as much as half of any bond issue might go toward the Springfield Bypass. Although a final route for the bypass was set almost four years ago, the road has always seemed a pipe dream because of its huge cost, county officials say. The officials have not yet decided the exact amount the November referendum will ask for.

Now, board members say, the General Assembly's decision to lift the ceiling on the amount of money the county can borrow to fund new roads makes it a more realistic priority.

"I think the expectations of our citizens have been heightened" by the General Assembly's actions, said Supervisor Martha V. Pennino (D-Centreville).

"We have to move now that we have the ability to do this," said Supervisor Joseph Alexander (D-Lee).

The General Assembly had previously set the county's borrowing ceiling through road bonds at $55 million. In two referendums in 1981 and 1982, the county gained approval for borrowing that amount for 28 different road projects.

The board also voted to create a committee of builders, real estate brokers, bankers, citizens and public officials to recommend programs to meet the housing needs of the poor, elderly and disadvantaged in the county.

County officials have long said that increasingly scarce federal funds for public housing have forced local governments to turn to the private sector for help in building affordable housing.

"The private sector has to play a crucial role in meeting the housing needs of these disadvantaged families," said Supervisor James Scott (D-Providence).

Fairfax currently faces a severe shortage of rental units and inexpensive housing. The vacancy rate for rental units in the county was 2 percent last year, the lowest rate in the past decade. Fairfax Weighs Bond Issue Springfield Bypass Included in Plans By Lee Hockstader Washington Post Staff Writer

The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors agreed yesterday to formulate a bond issue proposal for voters in November that could channel up to $80 million to county road improvements, including a start on construction of the Springfield Bypass.

The 6-to-0 vote was possible because of a bill passed in the just-ended 1985 session of the Virginia General Assembly to allow greater borrowing power for localities to fund road improvements.

Board members said they hoped to develop a package of highway projects that could be "fast-tracked" -- pushed through the Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation more quickly than usual.

Chief among the projects, board members said, would be the Springfield Bypass, a $200 million, 35-mile highway that would eventually connect Rte. 7 in the county's northwest with I-95 in the southeast, acting as a parallel, "outer" Beltway. Fairfax transportation officials have long said that the bypass would ease traffic congestion throughout the fast-growing county.

County Board of Supervisors Chairman John F. Herrity, who introduced the resolution for a referendum, said that as much as half of any bond issue might go toward the Springfield Bypass. Although a final route for the bypass was set almost four years ago, the road has always seemed a pipe dream because of its huge cost, county officials say. The officials have not yet decided the exact amount the November referendum will ask for.

Now, board members say, the General Assembly's decision to lift the ceiling on the amount of money the county can borrow to fund new roads makes it a more realistic priority.

"I think the expectations of our citizens have been heightened" by the General Assembly's actions, said Supervisor Martha V. Pennino (D-Centreville).

"We have to move now that we have the ability to do this," said Supervisor Joseph Alexander (D-Lee).

The General Assembly had previously set the county's borrowing ceiling through road bonds at $55 million. In two referendums in 1981 and 1982, the county gained approval for borrowing that amount for 28 different road projects.

The board also voted to create a committee of builders, real estate brokers, bankers, citizens and public officials to recommend programs to meet the housing needs of the poor, elderly and disadvantaged in the county.

County officials have long said that increasingly scarce federal funds for public housing have forced local governments to turn to the private sector for help in building affordable housing.

"The private sector has to play a crucial role in meeting the housing needs of these [disadvantaged] families," said Supervisor James Scott (D-Providence).

Fairfax currently faces a severe shortage of rental units and inexpensive housing. The vacancy rate for rental units in the county was 2 percent last year, the lowest rate in the past decade.