A Howard University premedical student died yesterday of injuries he received while test-driving a motorcycle, Fairfax police said.

Eric Green, 23, of Lanham, apparently lost control of the motorcycle about 11 a.m. on a curve in the 4800 block of Powell Road, police said. He sheared off a small pine tree and ran into a larger tree, they said.

Green was pronounced dead an hour later at Fairfax Hospital , according to a hospital spokeswoman.

Police said Green was test-driving a motorcycle owned by a Falls Church man when the accident occurred. The owner said he was too upset about the death to discuss the circumstances.

Green lived with his mother, LuEthel Green, and his two sisters, Leisa, 20, and Reisa, 18. His father, John A. Green, is a resident of Largo.

Green had been appointed to West Point Military Academy by then U.S. representative Gladys Spellman of Maryland and spent a year there in 1980-81 before deciding to switch to a premedical program at Howard University, his mother said.

Green was majoring in microbiology and worked in the emergency room as a receiving clerk at Howard University hospital on weekends, she said.

"I hate those things," his mother said of motorcycles. "My father was killed in a motorcycle accident when I was 5. I had bought [her son] a nice car when he graduated from DuVal [High School] in 1980 . . . but he just loved motorcycles."

Green had owned a motorcycle previously, but his mother encouraged him to sell it, she said. He was licensed to drive them, she added. "The police said he did have a helmet on," she said.

She said she had been unaware that he had planned to buy another motorcycle, but police told her he saw the motorcycle advertised in a newspaper and called the owner last week.

"He worked last night and I didn't see him because I left for church early this morning," she said. "When I got back from the Easter service, the police were there to tell me. It's all so hard to take.

"It's ironic," she said. "I was happy he left West Point because I didn't want him killed in a war." Motorcycle Test Drive Is Fatal to Md. Man Eric Green Was Premedical Student By Margaret Engel Washington Post Staff Writer

A Howard University premedical student died yesterday of injuries he received while test-driving a motorcycle, Fairfax police said.

Eric Green, 23, of Lanham, apparently lost control of the motorcycle about 11 a.m. on a curve in the 4800 block of Powell Road, police said. He sheared off a small pine tree and ran into a larger tree, they said.

Green was pronounced dead an hour later at Fairfax Hospital , according to a hospital spokeswoman.

Police said Green was test-driving a motorcycle owned by a Falls Church man when the accident occurred. The owner said he was too upset about the death to discuss the circumstances.

Green lived with his mother, LuEthel Green, and his two sisters, Leisa, 20, and Reisa, 18. His father, John A. Green, is a resident of Largo.

Green had been appointed to West Point Military Academy by then U.S. representative Gladys Spellman of Maryland and spent a year there in 1980-81 before deciding to switch to a premedical program at Howard University, his mother said.

Green was majoring in microbiology and worked in the emergency room as a receiving clerk at Howard University hospital on weekends, she said.

"I hate those things," his mother said of motorcycles. "My father was killed in a motorcycle accident when I was 5. I had bought her son a nice car when he graduated from DuVal High School in 1980 . . . but he just loved motorcycles."

Green had owned a motorcycle previously, but his mother encouraged him to sell it, she said. He was licensed to drive them, she added. "The police said he did have a helmet on," she said.

She said she had been unaware that he had planned to buy another motorcycle, but police told her he saw the motorcycle advertised in a newspaper and called the owner last week.

"He worked last night and I didn't see him because I left for church early this morning," she said. "When I got back from the Easter service, the police were there to tell me. It's all so hard to take.

"It's ironic," she said. "I was happy he left West Point because I didn't want him killed in a war."