The Federal Aviation Administration will suspend the license of a Woodbridge pilot who allegedly caused a "very near miss" with an Eastern Air Lines jet last month when he improperly flew into National Airport airspace, an agency spokesman said yesterday.

"He almost caused a terribly serious accident," FAA spokesman Dick Stafford said of the June 9 incident involving pilot Dennis J. Diantonio, who was flying a friend in his Grumman TR2 private plane from Woodbridge Airport to Wildwood, N.J., that morning.

In addition to violating the airspace, the FAA spokesman said, Diantonio did not not use the equipment pilots are required to have to communicate with the control tower.

Diantonio said yesterday he had not been informed of the FAA's decision to suspend his license for 60 days, but would appeal the decision. Diantonio, who acknowledged "accidentally" penetrating the airspace, disputed part of the FAA's account.

"It wasn't a near miss," Diantonio said. "There was nothing that jeopardized either aircraft . . . . It wasn't a situation where we had to do a hard avoidance."

According to the FAA, Diantonio flew his single-engine plane into "tightly controlled airspace" around the airport without authorization from the control tower shortly before 10 a.m. that day.

About that time, the FAA said, an Atlanta-bound Eastern 727 three-engine jet had taken off and was about seven miles southwest of the airport when the alleged incident occurred.

The captain of the Eastern jet, who filed a complaint with the FAA, was warned twice by the control tower that Diantonio's plane was three miles, then one mile away, an FAA press release said.

The Eastern pilot spotted the smaller aircraft when it was about a mile away and reported that it had passed below him when he was at 3,500 feet. The FAA said it was unable to determine the altitude of Diantonio's plane because it did not show on the radar.

Aircraft flying into controlled airspace must have certain equipment, including a device that automatically transmits identity and altitude information on radar screens used by controllers. But, the FAA said, Diantonio's aircraft was flying under visual flight rules, a "see-and-be-seen" procedure.

Diantonio, 32, who has had his commercial license since 1975, said he had some "transceiver problems" and was not in two-way communication. "I could hear them, but they couldn't hear me," he said, adding that he believed the tower had picked him up on radar.

"It was an accident. It wasn't an intentional penetration of airspace," he said. " . . . I was several miles east of National. It wasn't like I was flying over the White House." FAA to Suspend License of Va. Pilot Official Alleges Light Plane Caused 'Very Near Miss' By Nancy Scannell Washington Post Staff Writer

The Federal Aviation Administration will suspend the license of a Woodbridge pilot who allegedly caused a "very near miss" with an Eastern Air Lines jet last month when he improperly flew into National Airport airspace, an agency spokesman said yesterday.

"He almost caused a terribly serious accident," FAA spokesman Dick Stafford said of the June 9 incident involving pilot Dennis J. Diantonio, who was flying a friend in his Grumman TR2 private plane from Woodbridge Airport to Wildwood, N.J., that morning.

In addition to violating the airspace, the FAA spokesman said, Diantonio did not not use the equipment pilots are required to have to communicate with the control tower.

Diantonio said yesterday he had not been informed of the FAA's decision to suspend his license for 60 days, but would appeal the decision. Diantonio, who acknowledged "accidentally" penetrating the airspace, disputed part of the FAA's account.

"It wasn't a near miss," Diantonio said. "There was nothing that jeopardized either aircraft . . . . It wasn't a situation where we had to do a hard avoidance."

According to the FAA, Diantonio flew his single-engine plane into "tightly controlled airspace" around the airport without authorization from the control tower shortly before 10 a.m. that day.

About that time, the FAA said, an Atlanta-bound Eastern 727 three-engine jet had taken off and was about seven miles southwest of the airport when the alleged incident occurred.

The captain of the Eastern jet, who filed a complaint with the FAA, was warned twice by the control tower that Diantonio's plane was three miles, then one mile away, an FAA press release said.

The Eastern pilot spotted the smaller aircraft when it was about a mile away and reported that it had passed below him when he was at 3,500 feet. The FAA said it was unable to determine the altitude of Diantonio's plane because it did not show on the radar.

Aircraft flying into controlled airspace must have certain equipment, including a device that automatically transmits identity and altitude information on radar screens used by controllers. But, the FAA said, Diantonio's aircraft was flying under visual flight rules, a "see-and-be-seen" procedure.

Diantonio, 32, who has had his commercial license since 1975, said he had some "transceiver problems" and was not in two-way communication. "I could hear them, but they couldn't hear me," he said, adding that he believed the tower had picked him up on radar.

"It was an accident. It wasn't an intentional penetration of airspace," he said. " . . . I was several miles east of National. It wasn't like I was flying over the White House."