*Nov. 21, 1984 -- D.C. Del. Walter Fauntroy, U.S. Civil Rights Commissioner Mary Frances Berry and Randall Robinson arrested at the South African Embassy after a sit-in in the ambassador's office to protest apartheid and the jailing of black trade unionists.

*Nov. 23 -- Fauntroy, Berry and Robinson announce the formation of the Free South Africa Movement and say protests at the embassy will become a weekday ritual. In the months ahead, 23 members of Congress, Stevie Wonder, Harry Belafonte, Amy Carter, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and Coretta Scott King join hundreds of labor, church, civil rights and civic leaders who are arrested.

*Nov. 30 -- U.S. Attorney Joseph diGenova begins dismissing charges against the embassy demonstrators, saying they lack "prosecutive merit." Privately, his office expesses concerns that protest "show trials" will further clog the courts.

*Dec. 2 -- South African Bishop and Nobel Prize winner Desmond Tutu attends special Washington Cathedral service and thanks embassy protesters.

*Dec. 3 -- The Reagan administration defends its policy of "constructive engagement" with South Africa.

*March 7 -- The Anti-Apartheid Act of 1985 calling for U.S. economic sanctions against South Africa is introduced in the House.

*June 5 -- House approves sanctions bill, 295 to 127.

*July 11 -- Senate votes 80 to 12 for a less-sweeping bill.

*July 31 -- House and Senate negotiators approve package of economic sanctions. President Reagan says he opposes the bill.

*Aug. 12 -- More than 5,000 antiapartheid demonstrators, including New York Mayor Ed Koch and actor Paul Newman, hold symbolic funeral procession to the State Department to protest U.S.-South Africa relations.

*Sept. 9 -- Reagan averts showdown with Congress by signing an executive order containing milder economic sanctions. The Republican-controlled Senate backs the administration's measures, but supporters of tougher sanctions say they will keep pushing for stronger legislation.