*Budget: Gov. Harry Hughes' $8.2 billion operating budget for fiscal 1987 was approved yesterday by the Senate and the House after adoption of a conference committee report that cut $29.6 million from the plan. A $220 million capital budget recommendation was pending in the Senate.

*Burning Tree: A bill to strip Burning Tree Club in Bethesda of its annual $186,000 tax break unless it admits women has passed the Senate and is awaiting action in a House committee.

*Chesapeake Bay: A bill to restrict land use near the bay and its tributaries has passed the House and the Senate. Legislation to weaken the restrictions mildly is pending in the Senate.

*Credit cards: A bill to limit credit card interest charges and require notification of credit card charges in advertising has been killed by a House committee.

*Guns: Measures to allow Baltimore to write its own gun control legislation and to overturn a Maryland court decision allowing victims to sue manufacturers of cheap handguns were killed in a Senate committee. Another bill overturning the same decision passed a House committee and has been sent to the full House.

*Education aid: The Senate-passed version increases education aid to local governments by $14 million for one year. The House-passed measure increases aid by $335 million over six years. Differences must be resolved by a conference committee.

*Ethics package: Bills to put under disclosure laws those lobbyists who work only over the telephone and those who lobby for executive regulations, and to require lobbying organizations to report financial backers, have passed the Senate and are pending in a House committee.

*Housing initiative: A Hughes-sponsored initiative to authorize minimum statewide housing standards; to subsidize production of low-income housing; to subsidize community facilities for the mentally ill and retarded adults, and to authorize rent subsidies for low-income adults has passed both houses, with the differences to be resolved by a conference committee.

*Insurance package: Measures are pending to limit damage awards for pain and suffering in medical malpractice cases, to require evidence of possible malpractice before filing suit, to toughen peer review procedures; to limit awards against local governments and to require notice of rate increases. Most bills have passed the Senate. One bill has passed the House; others are still pending in House committee.

*Obscene lyrics: A bill to prohibit the sale to minors of records and tapes with obscene lyrics has passed the House and is pending in a Senate committee.

*Seat belts: A bill to require drivers and front seat passengers to wear seat belts has passed the both houses, with minor differences to be resolved in conference committee.

* S&L regulation: A measure imposing tough restrictions on investments by savings and loans and prohibiting most insider dealing has passed the House and the Senate, with a conference committee to settle differences.

*Tax amnesty: A bill to allow delinquent taxpayers to pay back taxes without penalties during a 60-day period later this year has passed the Senate. It has passed the House with a provision to funnel 60 percent of the money raised to localities and 40 percent to the state. The differences are to be worked out in a conference committee.

*Voter registration: A bill would force municipalities to stop requiring voters to register separately for local and state elections. A weaker alternative directs municipalities to notify voters and other town residents about the need to register separately, and it allows voters to register by mail; it has passed the House and is pending in a Senate committee.

*Writing Test: A bill to delay implementation of a state writing test as a graduation requirement has passed the House and is pending in a Senate committee.