QUESTION:

What do you see as the most important issue facing your district?

Brentsville District

Democrats: Vote for no more than one.

Norborne P. Beville Jr.

Richard "Rick" Mechalske

Norborne P. Beville Jr.

9000 Burwell Rd., Nokesville

Age: 46

Lawyer; U.S. Army lieutenant, Airborne Ranger, 1st Infantry, Vietnam; chairman, Prince William Democratic Committee (1975-77 and 1983-85); member, Prince William County Electoral Board (1979-81); Prince William Zoning Ordinance Review Committee (1980); Kiwanis Chamber of Commerce; Prince William County Electoral Board (1975-present); American Legion, and VFW; Director, National Capital MS Society; Past Chairman, Prince William MS Society; Graduate, University of Richmond and University of Virginia Law School.

The most important issues facing Brentsville are growth and transportation. These problems are currently more critical in other parts of Prince William County, but as one of the remaining largely undeveloped areas, Brentsville will continue to face them to an increasing extent. While growth cannot, and should not, be stopped under Virginia law, it must be controlled by use of the Comprehensive Plan and conditional zoning. Only in this way can service and transportation be allowed to keep pace with development. Orderly growth will ensure that an adverse impact is not felt by our schools or our police, fire and rescue services. We must maintain these operations at high standards and make improvements when consistent with sound fiscal policy. I believe this can be achieved within the next four years and I look forward to the challenge.

Richard "Rick" Mechalske

8015 Rugby Rd., Manassas

Age: 35

Resident of Brentsville 11 years; member of Democratic Committee for five years, chairman for two years; officer and member of Signal Hill Lions Club; member, Manassas Elks #2512; member, United Food and Commercial Workers Local 400; holds state auctioneer license; active in local sports for youth.

The most important issue facing Prince William voters this year is transportation. Our roads are overcrowded, and what 10 years ago was a 20-minute commute now takes an hour. This problem is caused by lack of planning by the Planning Commission. The comprehensive plan must be followed to the letter to control runaway growth. Future developers must look to improve immediate roads prior to developing. Prince William has to stop putting the cart before the horse.

Republicans: Vote for no more than one.

William J. Becker

Carroll A. Weimer Jr.

William J. Becker

7714 Signal Hill Rd., Manassas

Age: 67

Retired; owner, Master Business Service Inc; veteran, civil service employe, Air Force, gained experience in business and government management and systems and budget analysis; employe, large public corporation, Tracor Inc., part-owner, small business in Manassas; lived in Prince William County since 1955; active in civic and religious organizations; treasurer, local Republican Party; deacon, Bethel Evangelical Lutheran Church; secretary and bible distribution secretary, Prince William West Gideons Camp; president, Manassas Host Lions Club.

The task of a supervisor is much more than just to consider a single issue. He or she must understand all the major needs of the electorate, which in Prince William County include the following: keeping growth at a rate that will allow our roads, utilities, schools and other services to keep pace, and to make sure that such growth does not radically change or degrade an established neighborhood; working with the state highway department and other jurisdictions to improve methods of entering and leaving the county; making every effort to attract white collar industry; working to insure the county education system is well managed and adequately funded, and that the educational needs of the population are met, and maintaining pressure on county government to insure that it is managed to provide the citizen with services at the lowest possible cost.

Carroll A. Weimer Jr.

10158 Wilmington St., Manassas

Age: 31

Brentsville representative to Community Services Board; member, Nokesville Volunteer Fire Department; member, Nokesville Ruritan Club; former police officer in Manassas and Alexandria; graduate, Brentsville District High School; B.A., University of Virginia; graduate, George Mason University Law School; member, Virginia Bar; partner, law firm of Weimer & Boyce.

Improving roads is the single most important issue facing the Brentsville District, but it is closely connected with another important issue, which is controlling development. Roads within the district and within the county need to be improved and widened to accommodate the current level of traffic and anticipated increases. Development cannot be halted so roads can be built, so the county needs to move quickly to widen such roads as Rte. 234, Rte. 28, and Davis Ford Road. In addition, construction should begin as soon as possible on the Rte. 234 bypass. Dumfries District

Democrats: Vote for no more than one.

Floyd C. Bagley

Edwin Clark King

Floyd C. Bagley

18316 Possum Point Rd., P.O. Box 1168, Dumfries

Age: 65

Lawyer; elected to Virginia House of Delegates six times 1976-86; currently chairman of Commission on Veterans' Affairs of Virginia; county attorney for 10 years; town attorney, 1963-69; president of Prince William Bar Association, 1973; member of American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, M.C. League, INLOA, National Wildlife, NAA, Audubon Society, American Trial Lawyers Association, DU, American Bar Association; currently chairman of Prince William County Democratic Committee.

The major issue in the primary is whether my 26 years in local government as a town and county attorney and a 10-year legislator is of more value to Dumfries than the three years of my opponent, who registered to vote in 1979. I will act on major issues such as transportation, roads and enlarging the county tax base by withholding approval of new zonings until services like police and fire protection, schools and recreation areas are either in place or the money to fund them is available, not by requiring huge expenditures and tax increases to further burden the homeowner. As this county's first county attorney, I was aware that conditional zoning was an absolute necessity, and as a freshman member of the House of Delegates got that passed in 1976.

Edwin Clark King

18307 Cabin Rd., Triangle

Age: 57

Incumbent

As chairman, Board of County Supervisors, got George Mason University to put satellite campus in Prince William and initiated county staff study of the formation of Prince William as its own transportation district (subsequently passed by Virginia General Assembly); was chairman of the Northern Virginia Commuter Rail Task Force subcommittee; in Dumfries, obtained board support for constructing Henderson Elementary School, obtained Dumfries Mini-Library one year ahead of schedule, acquired 13 acres from the Pattie School site for use as a park, placed addition to Dumfries Elementary School on bond referendum.

The most important issue facing my district are the thousands of acres that are zoned at a "high density" residential level. These undeveloped tracts, if built as zoned, would overburden roads, schools, parks and county revenue. Prince William has become a prime development area. Careful deliberation and patient negotiation with developers is necessary to insure managed growth. Managing growth means acquiring the proper mix of residential, commercial and industrial development. A supervisor must be willing to devote full time to the task and should have demonstrated the ability to do so. By having done this for the last 3 1/2 years, the Board of Supervisors was able to lower real estate, personal property and business and professional tax rates.

Gainesville District

Democrats:

Vote for no more than one.

Claude J. "Brad" Bradshaw

Robert L. Cole

Claude J. "Brad" Bradshaw

11913 Bluebird La., Catharpin

Age: 52

25 years in U.S. Air Force, awarded four Distinguished Flying Crosses for combat missions in Vietnam; board member of Rural Virginia Development Foundation; trustee, Prince William League for Protection of Natural Resources; helped win congressional funding for expanding Manassas battlefield; vice chairman, Gainesville District Democratic Committee; past president of Taxpayer's Association for Prudent Spending (TAPS).

The overriding issue is gridlocked roads, bursting schools, environmental hazards and exorbitant taxes caused by wildfire development. The current board has put developers first, citizens second, with deplorable results. Prince William is demanding prudent, managed development and strong, accountable leadership. I support strict adherence to our comprehensive plan (no more "spot zoning"); completion of the Rte. 234 bypass south of I-66; a countywide bus system with tie-ins to Metro; pacing future development so as not to outstrip roads, schools, and services; funds to complete Flat Branch food control; NO landfills or dumps in Gainesville; repeal of the new county tax on first-year motor vehicle ownership; mandatory disclosure of ties between officials and developers; and state impact-fees legislation to make developers share the cost of public improvements.

Robert L. Cole

9405 Blackstone Road, Manassas

Age: 45

Associate broker, Re/Max Olympic Realty; board of directors, Prince William County Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services; board of directors, Prince William Crime Solvers; board of directors, Prince William branch of American Heart Association; member, Prince William Drunk Driving Task Force; Jaycees Outstanding Young Man of the Year, 1972-73; Outstanding Club President, Civitan International, Chesapeake District; Award of Excellence, Manassas Association of Retarded Citizens; commendation from the Prince William Board of Supervisors; Realtors Citizenship Award from Prince William Board of Realtors/National Association of Realtors; Realtor of the Year Award from Prince William Board of Realtors, 1983; member, Bicentennial Committee, Manassas/Prince William County.

The most serious and certainly the most important issue facing citizens of the Gainesville District is that of traffic. Thousands of our residents commute into the metropolitan area to work. I believe the county must make the relief of this situation a top priority, beginning, without further delay, the construction of the Rte. 234 bypass. More commuter buses are needed (we have three compared to 18 in eastern Prince William). HOV lanes on I-66 from Gainesville to the Beltway should be created by paving the highway shoulders. This will encourage more car and van pools, reducing commuting time. Commuter rail and more buses to the Vienna Metro station will also help. This will be an ongoing problem and will require constant attention by the Board of Supervisors.

Gainesville District

Republicans:

Vote for no more than one.

John W. Dempewolf Jr.

Helen E. "Betty" Duley

Guy A. "Tony" Guiffre

John W. Dempewolf Jr.

16113 Sumney Dr., Haymarket

Age: 41

Engineer/scientist, IBM Corp.; member, Prince William County Board of Supervisors 1980-84; Prince William County representative, Virginia Association of Counties Social Services Committee; Vietnam veteran, United States Navy; member, Washington-Dulles Task Force Advisory Council; Prince William County Northwest Area Planning Advisory Commission; delegate to numerous Republican conventions; Finance Committee Secretary, All Saints School Finance Committee; Board of Directors, Bull Run/Evergreen Lions Club; listed in "Who's Who in Washington, Position and Leadership in the Nation's Capital," 1983 edition;

Growth and development is the major concern of Gainesville residents. Roads must be improved to handle traffic from the increased population; Rte. 66 has become a gigantic parking lot during rush hours. Growth must be controlled and be in conformance with the approved comprehensive plan. The Board of Supervisors should protect our residential neighborhoods from capricious and undesirable rezonings and placement of county dumps in their midsts. Bull Run Mountain Estates is threatened by construction of additional microwave antenna towers, and development is causing flooding in the Loch Lomond area. Our current supervisor supports dumps in western Prince William, microwave antennas on Bull Run Mountain, and has failed to fund flood control in Loch Lomond. The Gainesville District needs a leader who can solve our districts problems. I offer that kind of leadership.

Helen E. "Betty" Duley

4507 Sanders La., Catharpin

Age: 52

Activist; homemaker; vice president, member of Prince William County Historical Society; helped in publication of "Prince William: A Past to Preserve"; sponsored placement of five historical markers in western Prince William; member, Division Planning Council for Prince William School Board Superintendent, Prince William County Court House Anti-Relocation Steering Committee; kept Judicial Center in Manassas by Referendum; volunteer, Prince William Hospital Auxiliary; member, Committee for a Western Library, 1982; chairman, Concerned Citizens of Prince William County; president, United Methodist Women, Sudley Methodist Church; life member, Sudley Methodist Church, Catharpin; Bull Rull Republican Womens Club.

The main issue is effective planning of growth and development. Congested commuter roads are my concern. I will work with elected officials to increase state revenue for critical transportation needs including commuter rail. I support planned growth while preserving open space. I favor standards of quality in our schools and elected school boards. The tax rate should be lowered with elimination of government waste. I will fight against future solid waste landfills and address flood problems. I believe your elected supervisor should speak with uniformity in public pronouncements of volatile community issues. I will be a full-time supervisor who listens and will establish a citizens advisory group to address community concerns. The issue before the Gainesville voter is: Are you better off today than you were four years ago?

Guy A. "Tony" Guiffre

5505 Pageland La., Gainesville

Age: 44

incumbent

Prince William County supervisor since January 1984; Northern Virginia Planning District Commissioner since January 1984; Potomac and Rappahannock Transportation District commissioner and treasurer since August 1985.

The most important issue facing my district, the entire county, Northern Virginia, and the Washington metropolitan area is transportation. Why? Our citizens cannot get back and forth to their places of work in a reasonable amount of time. This not only impacts our quality of life but also has a devastating effect on our economic development. An issue overlooked by some is that government is big business and its elected officials must bring to its management something more than election slogans. I have 25-plus years of business experience, and 3 1/2 years of experience in managing Prince William County. Government must serve its people, not itself. Using my past experience and citizen input, I will work to achieve a strong yet fiscally conservative Prince William government. Woodbridge District

Democrats: Vote for no more than one.

Hilda Marie Barg

Lucian L. Johnson

Hilda Marie Barg

2204 Cherry Hill Rd., Dumfries

Age: 53

Retired business woman; active member, Triangle Baptist Church; past member, Prince William County Soroptimist Club; past president, Prince William Hairdressers Association; volunteer driver for senior citizens; member, American Legion Auxiliary; volunteer, American Cancer Society; volunteer worker, Special Olympics; lifelong resident of district.

The most important issue in this election is the damage to our quality of life in the Woodbridge District caused by rapid development without the necessary provisions for adequate school facilities and roads to accommodate new residents. The results of this development have been excessive taxes on homes and personal property. If elected I will be a full-time working supervisor for the people.

Lucian L. Johnson

14618 Featherstone Rd., Woodbridge

DID NOT RESPOND TO QUESTIONNAIRE.