ODIE ROBERT HOWELL JR.,

65, a retired State Department official who was a 33rd degree Mason of the Scottish Rite and director of lay speaking and Methodist Men for the Methodist Church in Virginia, died of cancer July 20 at Fairfax Hospital.

Mr. Howell, who lived in Alexandria, was chairman of the board of trustees of the Mount Vernon United Methodist Church. A lay preacher himself, he had been a delegate to Virginia and Southeast conferences of the church.

As a Mason, he was master of the Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22 and district deputy grand master of the Grand Lodge of Virginia. He was a member of the Kena Temple of the Shrine and the International Supreme Council of the Order of DeMolay. For several years he was executive officer of the Order of DeMolay in Virginia.

He was president of the Collingwood Library and Museum on Americanism and a member of the Sojourners. He had been active in the Boy Scouts and other youth and school groups.

Born in Washington, Mr. Howell was raised in Arlington. He graduated from Washington-Lee High School. He attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute and graduated from the National Academy of Broadcasting.

During World War II, he served in the Army Air Forces in North Africa. He was recalled to active duty as a member of the Air Force Reserve during the Korean War.

Mr. Howell went to work for the State Department in the early 1940s and his career was in administration and budgeting. From 1961 to 1963, he was on loan to the Peace Corps. He retired from State in 1975.

Survivors include his wife of 44 years, Margaret Bixler Howell of Alexandria; two sons, Robert Lyndon Howell of Alexandria and Thomas Gordon Howell of Herndon; one sister, Barbara M. Taylor of Warrenton, Va.; one brother, Richard E. Howell of Sterling, and six grandchildren.

LEON B. POULLADA,

74, a retired Foreign Service officer who was ambassador to Togo from 1961 to 1964, died of cancer July 17 at his home in St. Paul, Minn.

Mr. Poullada joined the Foreign Service in 1948 and had been assigned to Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Washington before he was named ambassador to Togo.

He retired from the Foreign Service in 1964, earned a doctorate in South Asian studies at Princeton and from 1971 to 1975 taught political science at Northern Arizona University. In 1975 he moved to St. Paul.

He was born in Santa Rosa, N.M. He earned a law degree at Southwestern University in Los Angeles. He served in the Army in the Pacific during World War II. He was a lawyer at the Nuremburg war crimes trials after the war and also served as an Army-appointed defense counsel for a group of German rocket scientists accused of having used slave labor.

Survivors include his wife, Leila Poullada of St. Paul; two sons, Peter Poullada of Istanbul, and Phillip Poullada of Port Washington, N.Y.; a daughter, Sofia Hafiza Safipour of Saratoga, Calif., and a grandchild.

DOROTHY E. PRENCIPE,

84, who with her husband established four beauty salons in the Washington area, died of heart ailments July 21 at her home in Oxon Hill.

Mrs. Prencipe was born in Pennsylvania and reared in Washington. In 1935, she and her husband, Vincent Prencipe, opened the Dorothy Prencipe Beauty Salon in Washington. They later opened two other stores in the city and one in Arlington.

In 1959, Mrs. Prencipe retired and moved to Florida. She returned here in 1980.

Her husband, Vincent Prencipe, died in 1949. Survivors include a daughter, Jennie Cifala of Arlington; two brothers, Julie LaBuona of District Heights and Roma LaBuona of North Beach, Md.; three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

EDGAR A. KEENEY,

85, a former employe of Garfinckel's department store who later went into real estate, died of cancer July 20 at a hospital in Clearwater, Fla.

Mr. Keeney, who lived in Clearwater, was born in Frederick, Md. He moved to Washington about 1925 and later lived in Alexandria.

When he came here, Mr. Keeney went to work at Garfinckel's as a salesman in the shoe department. He left the store in the late 1940s and devoted full time to real estate investments. He retired in 1970 and moved to Florida.

His wife, Thelma Keeney, died in 1981. Survivors include one sister, Ada Dick of York, Pa.