FRANKLIN D. WILLIAMS,

86, a Mormon Church elder who was president of the Washington Temple before moving to Utah earlier this year, died Nov. 13 in Salt Lake City. The cause of death was not reported.

He was the first Utah director of Federal Housing Administration and later was appointed as a FHA national commissioner. He was president of the church's Northwest States Mission in Portland, Ore., in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and later served as an assistant to the church's Council of the Twelve. In 1976, he became a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy.

LOU BRESLOW,

87, a Hollywood screenwriter who worked on classic Marx Brothers comedies and with Val Burton wrote the popular 1951 film "Bedtime for Bonzo," which starred Ronald Reagan as the earnest baby sitter of an unpredictable chimpanzee, died of pneumonia Nov. 11 at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills.

In the 1920s, Mr. Breslow was an extra, cameraman and consultant on silent films. Later he became a contract screenwriter for Paramount Pictures and 20th Century-Fox. He wrote or assisted on nearly 100 screenplays during his 50-year career, including the Marx Brothers films "Duck Soup" and "Horse Feathers."

VALERY ALEXANDROVICH BELIKOV,

62, a Soviet Army general who had served as commander-in-chief of 400,000 Soviet troops in East Germany since August 1986, died of a heart attack Nov. 12 in Wuensdorf, south of Berlin.

He was a member of the Supreme Soviet and a nonvoting member of the Communist Party Central Committee. Gen. Belikov joined the Soviet army in 1942 and studied in the military academy for armored units and in the academy of the Soviet general staff. Before taking up his last post, he had commanded the Carpathian military district for seven years.

MICHAEL S. COMAY,

79, a retired Israeli diplomat who had served as ambassador to the United Nations in the 1960s, ambassador to Canada in the 1950s, and ambassador to Great Britain in the 1970s, died Nov. 6 in Jerusalem. The cause of death was not reported.

Mr. Comay had practiced law in his native South Africa and served with the South African army in North Africa during World War II before moving to Palestine. He worked for the Jewish Agency before joining the diplomatic service. He retired in 1979.