Nine in 10 Americans say they have never doubted the existence of God and eight in 10 believe they will face God at Judgment Day. Eight in 10 also believe that God works miracles today and say that they are "sometimes very conscious of the presence of God."

In general, those most likely to agree with these statements were women, nonwhites and people over 50.

They had less education and they were Roman Catholics and evangelical Protestants, many of whom described themselves as born-again Christians. Those least likely to agree were men, those with at least some college education and Jews.

Overall, 88 percent of those polled said they never doubted the existence of God.

Eighty-six percent of men and 90 percent of women made that statement, as did 87 percent of whites, 93 percent of nonwhites and 91 percent of Hispanics.

The percentage of those saying they never doubted God's existence rose with age -- 84 percent of those aged 18 to 24, 88 percent of those aged 25 to 29, 84 percent of those aged 30 to 39, 90 percent of those aged 40 to 59 and 93 percent of those aged 60 and over.

Responses to this question differed significantly according to education levels -- 94 percent of those with less than a high school education, 90 percent of high school graduates, 86 percent of those with some college and 78 percent of college graduates said they never doubted God's existence.

These findings are contained in the Times Mirror Corp.'s study "The People, Press and Politics." The study recorded only the percentage agreeing with the statements; negative and "don't know" responses were not included in the tabulation.

In terms of religious affiliation, 92 percent of Protestants, 90 percent of Catholics and 72 percent of Jews said they never doubted God's existence.

Among Protestants, 96 percent of evangelicals and 88 percent of nonevangelicals said they never doubted God's existence.

Among evangelical Protestants, this included 97 percent of whites and 95 percent of blacks. Among nonevangelicals, this included 87 percent of whites and 93 percent of blacks.

Eighty-one percent of those surveyed agreed that "we will all be called before God at the Judgment Day to answer for our sins."

The sharpest differences in response to this question came along denominational lines: Eighty-seven percent of Protestants, 85 percent of Catholics and only 37 percent of Jews said they believed in Judgment Day.

Among Protestants, 96 percent of evangelicals and 80 percent of nonevangelicals made this statement.

Black and white evangelicals held identical views, with 96 percent of each saying they believe in Judgment Day. But among nonevangelical Protestants, 90 percent of blacks and 79 percent of whites said they believe in Judgment Day.

Seventy-nine percent of men and 83 percent of women said they believe in Judgment Day, as did 80 percent of whites, 90 percent of nonwhites and 84 percent of Hispanics.

In terms of education, 91 percent of those who had not graduated from high school, 86 percent of high school graduates, 74 percent of those with some college and 66 percent of college graduates said they would face God on Judgment Day.

Eighty-two percent of those surveyed agreed that "even today, miracles are performed by the power of God."