As part of its plan to double the number of infant care centers available to teen-age mothers, the D.C. school system has considered opening a center at a Northeast elementary school.

The planned center, which would serve high school and junior high school students only, is "on hold," according to an administrator of the program.

An elementary school would be used only if high schools had no space to accommodate the center, school officials said.

On Wednesday, the system announced the opening of a 12-crib facility at Hart Junior High School on Mississippi Avenue SE to serve students from Hart and Ballou High School.

Centers are to open in the next year at Ballou and Spingarn High School.

Another facility is planned for somewhere in Ward 7, where 44 students reported pregnancies last year, according to Austine Fowler, the system's supervisor of early childhood education. Fifteen of those pregnant girls were high school students; 29 were enrolled in junior high schools.

D.C. Superintendent Floretta D. McKenzie has said that the Ward 7 center would be located at Drew Elementary School, 56th and Eads streets NE, one block from H.D. Woodson High School. McKenzie announced the plans for Drew at a news conference for student journalists last spring.

Yesterday, McKenzie did not respond to requests that she elaborate on that report. Schools spokesman Maurice Sykes said, "They did look at Drew . . . . They're looking at all buildings in the area, but Drew is not now being considered."

Fowler said the system first considered using an elementary school after Woodson High turned out to have no space to house the facility. But she said the use of Drew was put on hold because of concern that placing teen-age mothers in an elementary school might send the wrong message to young children.

"We backed off initially because of the questions that could be raised," she said.

Two school board members said they were aware of plans to place an infant care center in an elementary school.

"If one were to be in an elementary school, it would be servicing a high school," board President Linda Cropp (Ward 4) said. "The intent is as a deterrent, but more importantly serving the needs of the students. All students in the school would see that this is not fun, it's responsibility."

The infant care centers, which are paid for by the school system, the D.C. Department of Human Services and private foundation grants, are designed to involve teen-age mothers in caring for their children while allowing the mothers to continue their studies. Mothers are required to spend lunch hours with their children and must enroll in a parenting course.

Drew Principal Regina Rutledge said there are no pregnant children at her school. She said she knew there were plans some months ago to open an infant center at Drew, but she said she was unaware of any current effort.

STUDENT PREGNANCIES

D.C. PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1987 Ward High School Jr. High School ------------------------------------------------------- 1...................32....................10 2....................0.....................5 3....................7.....................1 4...................29.....................5 5 ..................69.....................8 6...................53 ....................6 7...................15....................29

8...................33....................24

SOURCE: District of Columbia Public Schools.

Chart shows only the number of public school students in each ward of the District who reported that they were pregnant last year.