HENRYK SZERYNG

Violin Virtuoso

Henryk Szeryng, 69, a noted violinist who revived many neglected works and brought several modern ones to public attention, died March 3 in Kassel, West Germany, of a cerebral hemorrhage.

Mr. Szeryng, who lived in Monaco, was born in Poland. He was a citizen of Mexico but lived most of his life in Europe. A recipient of numerous international awards, he was described by the late Arthur Rubenstein as an artist who gave his listeners moments of great emotion.

PHILIP HENRY ALSTON JR.

Ambassador to Australia

Philip Henry Alston Jr., 76, a confidant of President Jimmy Carter and a former ambassador to Australia, died March 2 in Atlanta. The cause of death was not reported.

An influential Atlanta lawyer, Mr. Alston was chairman of Carter's successful gubernatorial bid in 1970. He was chairman of the Committee for Jimmy Carter when Carter was elected president in 1976. As president, Carter appointed him ambassador to Australia.

LOUIS ZHANG JIASHU

Bishop of Shanghai

The Rev. Louis Zhang Jiashu, 96, the bishop of Shanghai who was a leading figure in the 3 million-member Chinese Catholic Church loyal to the communist government, died Feb. 25 in Shanghai. The cause of death was not reported.

He studied for 10 years in Britain and France before returning to China in 1924. He was vice chairman of the China Patriotic Catholic Association, which appoints bishops in defiance of Rome.

FLAVIO BRAVO

Cuban Assembly President

Flavio Bravo, 66, president of Cuba's National Assembly of People's Power, or parliament, since 1981 and president of the Young Communist League of Cuba in the late 1940s and early 1950s, died of cancer Feb. 27 in Havana.

He was a university student with Fidel Castro in the late 1940s. Although he was not known to have fought much against the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista, his early contacts with Castro developed into a warm friendship.

LESLIE H. TURNER

Comic Strip Artist

Leslie H. Turner, 88, the artist who wrote and illustrated the "Captain Easy" adventure comic strip for 27 years until retiring in 1970, died Feb. 28 in Orlando, Fla. The cause of death was not reported.

He became one of the top magazine illustrators of the 1920s and 1930s, but was best remembered for "Captain Easy." At its peak, the comic strip appeared in more than 600 daily newspapers. It addressed unpleasant subjects such as alcoholism as early as 1949, and won praise for being scientifically correct.