The following were among actions taken at the June 26 meeting of the District of Columbia Council.

SHELTER FOR THE HOMELESS -- The council gave final approval to a bill that limits the city's obligation to provide overnight shelter for the homeless.

The bill, intended to modify Initiative 17, the District's right-to-shelter law, would place a 30-day-limit on how long a person could stay at a city-operated shelter and a 90-day limit on how long a person with children could stay.

Under the current law, approved in a 1984 voter initiative, the city must spend whatever it takes to provide shelter for anyone who requests it.

The city is amending the law to save money. The cost of implementing the law nearly tripled from $10 to $27 million in the first three years of its existence, from 1985 to 1988. Without the limitation, it was estimated to cost the city $40 million this year.

The legislation requires approval of the mayor and would be effective after a 30-day period of congressional review.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE -- The council gave preliminary approval to a bill that requires District police to make arrests if they have evidence that domestic violence has occurred. In addition, the bill requires police to keep track of reports of family disturbances to identify repeat offenders.

District police aleady have a policy that says police officers "should" make arrests if they have evidence that domestic violence has occurred, but victim rights groups charge that police officers do not follow their own policy.

The bill was initiated by victim rights groups, who say that District police officers rarely make arrests in cases of domestic violence, viewing them as personal disputes. The council will take final action at its July 10 meeting.

CONDOMINIUM TRASH CREDIT -- The council gave final approval to a bill that provides a $60 tax credit per unit to owners of condominiums and cooperatives to offset the cost of paying private haulers to remove their trash.

The legislation requires approval of the mayor and would be effective after a 30-day period of congressional review. (See District Weekly article on page 8 for more details.)

WHISTLE BLOWER PROTECTION -- The council gave final approval to a bill that protects the jobs of city employees who provide information to any public body investigating city agencies or officials for misuse of D.C. government funds or violations of law.

The legislation requires approval of the mayor and would be effective after a 30-day period of congressional review.

AIRCRAFT NOISE FINES -- The council gave preliminary approval to a bill that increases the maximum penalty for violations of noise limitations at Washington National Airport from $2,500 to $50,000.

The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, of which both the District and Virginia are members, operates the airport under a lease from the federal goverment. Officials of the authority say increasing the fine is necessary to assure airline compliance with the aircraft noise limitations.

The legislation will not become effective until it is also approved by the Virginia General Assembly, which will vote on identical legislation when it reconvenes in 1991. The council will take final action at its July 10 meeting.

BUILDING HEIGHT CHANGES -- The council gave preliminary approval to a bill that increases the height limits along 14th Street between C and D streets SW in order to allow a large mixed-use complex that would have a maximum height of 110 feet.

Current D.C. law limits the height of buildings on that block to 80 feet. Developers have proposed building a complex on the block that would include 1.8 million square feet of office space, plus retail stores, a theater, a hotel and parking for 3,500 cars. The council will take final action at its July 10 meeting.

MANDELA RECOGNITION -- The council approved a ceremonial resolution welcoming Nelson and Winnie Mandela to the District. The resolution praises the African National Congress leader and his wife as "global pioneers" against injustice.