The Washington Metropolitan Council AFL-CIO, the major voice for organized labor in the area, voted last night to endorse Georgetown University law professor Eleanor Holmes Norton for D.C. delegate to Congress.

At the same time, the labor council voted to make no endorsement in the mayor's race -- a testament to the divided loyalties of union members among D.C. Council Chairman David A. Clarke, council members John Ray (D-At Large) and Charlene Drew Jarvis (D-Ward 4), and Del. Walter E. Fauntroy (D-D.C.).

The endorsement represents a major boost to Norton's candidacy, in part because it could open the door to major campaign donations from national labor unions, but also because it could mean significant grass-roots assistance for Norton. The labor council pledged to staff a telephone bank for Norton and also provide other volunteers to work the polls on Election Day.

"This endorsement represents the working people of Washington, D.C.," Norton said after last night's action. "When you put together the endorsement of the largest and most representative voters in this city, you smell victory."

Josyln N. Williams, the local AFL-CIO chief, said Norton, a newcomer to electoral politics, was chosen in part because of her credentials as a civil rights activist with extensive ties to Democratic Party leaders and other national figures.

The AFL-CIO endorsement was not the only good news for Norton yesterday. According to the first extensive finance reports, Norton raised $117,246 in campaign contributions, more than any other candidate in the crowded field.

Norton was buoyed by hefty contributions from major national political action committees, including the National Abortion Rights Action League, the American Federation of Teachers PAC, the United Auto Workers Capital PAC and the United Steelworkers PAC. Each group contributed the maximum $5,000.

The closest candidate to Norton in fund-raising was D.C. Council member Betty Ann Kane (D-At Large), who raised $64,000 during the April through June reporting period. Previously, Kane had raised $13,750, for a total of $77,750.

Former D.C. Council chairman Sterling Tucker raised $22,285; former Barry administration aide Joseph P. Yeldell raised $15,642; former congressional aide Donald M. Temple raised $21,781; and former school board member Barbara Lett Simmons raised $2,385.

On the Republican side, former U.S. Education Department official Harry M. Singleton reported raising $12,825 in the past three months, for a total of $22,568 in his campaign. Consultant Jim Champagne said he raised $17,965 in donations.

The reports for contractor Roffle Mayes Miller Jr., a Republican, and George X Cure, a legal adviser for the Nation of Islam who is seeking the Democratic nomination, were not available yesterday.

There was little opposition voiced to Norton's endorsement last night, even though Kane has already been endorsed by the firefighters and police unions and although Yeldell has long been considered a friend of organized labor.

Tucker also performed well in an AFL-CIO poll of 800 Democratic union members across the city, running a narrow second to Norton and ahead of Kane, labor officials said. They declined to release specific figures.

Thomas N. Tippett, president of the D.C. Firefighters Association and a Kane supporter, said that other local unions were pressured to support Norton by some of the international unions allied with the law professor. Williams denied the accusation, noting, "The locals here are quite capable of acting in their best interest."

According to Norton's finance filing with the Federal Election Commission, among those who contributed to her campaign are former Urban League chief Vernon Jordan, who gave $1,000; U.S. Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.), who gave $250; Democratic lobbyist Anne Wexler, who gave $500; actor Bill Cosby and his wife, Camille, who each gave $1,000; journalist Gloria Steinem, who gave $500; and David J. Stern, head of the National Basketball Association and a law school classmate of Norton's husband, Edward, who gave $1,000.

Kane received numerous contributions from prominent local business interests, including $5,000 from the federal political action committee for the Greater Washington Board of Trade, which has endorsed her candidacy. She also received $1,000 contributions from developer James Pedas; former banker Luther H. Hodges Jr.; lawyer Carl T. Rowan Jr.; and developers Robert Gladstone, Joey Kaempfer and Oliver T. Carr Jr.

Kane also received contributions from other business-oriented political action committees, including $1,000 from the D.C. Builders PAC; $1,000 from the PAC for American Security Bank; $1,000 from the PAC for MNC Financial Corp.; $2,500 from the Pepco PAC; and $5,000 from the Realtors Political Action Committee.

"We have just what we need to do what we need to do . . . and we're continuing to raise money," Kane said. "It is coming in very nicely."

Other candidates also said they were pleased with their performances, although some noted the difficulty of raising funds in a race for a federal office. Unlike candidates for local offices, those running for D.C. delegate are prohibited under federal campaign finance law from accepting contributions from corporations.

Tucker reported $1,000 contributions from former House of Representatives member Jim Stanton of Ohio, former Republican senator Paul Laxalt of Nevada, and International Business Machines Corp. Vice President Charles McKittrick Jr. "He feels good," said Tucker's press secretary, Jon Greene. " . . . He only had three weeks to fund raise, and the others had three months."

Yeldell, a longtime trouble-shooter for Mayor Marion Barry, reported numerous contributions from D.C. government workers, including $100 contributions from Fire Chief Ray Alfred, Housing and Community Development Director David Dennison and Barry aide Frank Jasmine.

Yeldell also received $250 contributions from former city administrator Elijah B. Rogers, city contractor Roy Littlejohn and developer Dominic Antonelli. Yeldell also loaned his own campaign a total of $9,032.

"We've got an office fully staffed, fully equipped," said Lorenzo White, Yeldell's campaign treasurer. "The only thing we need money for now is a media blitz."

REPORTING PERIOD APRIL-JUNE

DEMOCRATS

Candidate .................... Total Contributions .. Cash on Hand

George X Cure ................................ n/a ........... n/a

Betty Ann Kane ........................... $64,000 ....... $21,256

Eleanor Holmes Norton .................... 117,246 ........ 49,730

Barbara Lett Simmons ....................... 2,385 ......... 3,551

Donald M. Temple .......................... 21,781 ........ 14,948

Sterling Tucker ........................... 22,285 ........ 10,882

Joseph P. Yeldell ......................... 15,642 ......... 6,086

REPUBLICANS

Jim Champagne ............................. 17,965 ............ 50

Roffle Mayes Miller Jr. ...................... n/a ........... n/a

Harry M. Singleton ........................ 12,825 ......... 2,496

NOTE: n/a means not available

SOURCE: From candidates and from campaign finance reports to the Federal Election Commission.