The following is a report of how some major bills fared in Congress last week and a record of how local members of Congress voted.

Maryland senators are Democrats Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski. Virginia senators are Republican John W. Warner and Democrat Charles S. Robb.

Maryland representatives to the House are Roy P. Dyson (D-1st), Benjamin L. Cardin (D-3rd), Tom McMillen (D-4th), Steny H. Hoyer (D-5th), Beverly B. Byron (D-6th), and Constance A. Morella (R-8th).

Virginia representatives are D. French Slaughter (R-7th), Stan Parris (R-8th), and Frank R. Wolf (R-10th).

NV means Not Voting.

HOUSE VOTES

FUNDING THE ARTS

By a vote of 175 for and 249 against, the House rejected a conservative-sponsored crackdown on National Endowment of the Arts funding of sexually explicit artworks. The House later passed legislation (HR 4825) authorizing $175 million in fiscal 1991 for the endowment. The bill increased federal scrutiny of artists receiving public money but left questions of obscenity to the courts. The rejected amendment sought, in part, to deny funding of projects that depict sexual conduct such as masturbation and sado-masochistic abuse or which tear down a religion. A yes vote was to keep taxpayers' money from funding sexually explicit art.

................. Yes ... No ... NV

MARYLAND

Byron.............. X

Cardin.................... X

Dyson.............. X

Hoyer..................... X

McMillen.................. X

Morella................... X

VIRGINIA

Parris............. X

Slaughter.......... X

Wolf............... X

TO UPHOLD TEXTILE VETO

By a vote of 275 for and 152 against, the House fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to overturn President Bush's veto of a bill limiting the growth of textile and apparel imports to one percent annually. The measure (HR 4328) also sought to freeze non-rubber footwear imports at 1989 levels. Canada and Israel would be exempted from the bill. Supporters said the bill would protect jobs and factories against unfair foreign competition, while opponents said it would mask industry inefficiencies and raise retail prices. A yes vote was to protect the domestic textile, apparel and non-rubber footwear industries.

................. Yes ... No ... NV

MARYLAND

Byron.............. X

Cardin............. X

Dyson.............. X

Hoyer.............. X

McMillen........... X

Morella................... X

VIRGINIA

Parris............. X

Slaughter.......... X

Wolf...................... X

BUDGET PLAN

By a vote of 250 for and 164 against, the House approved a blueprint for tax increases and spending restraint that would reduce the deficit by about $40 billion in fiscal 1991 and $500 billion between 1991-95. Later approved by the Senate (below), the measure (H Con Res 310) is the new vehicle for ending strife over the federal budget. It replaced the fiscal agreement authored by President Bush and bipartisan legislative leaders that met defeat on Capitol Hill Oct. 5. While keeping the broad outline of the rejected plan, the new measure gives congressional committees more leeway to determine the taxes to be raised and spending to be curbed. With President Bush staying mostly on the sidelines, and Democrats in charge of congressional committees, final details are expected to be more favorable to Democratic lawmakers and their constituencies than was the rejected blueprint. A yes vote supported the budget resolution.

................. Yes ... No ... NV

MARYLAND

Byron.............. X

Cardin............. X

Dyson..................... X

Hoyer.............. X

McMillen........... X

Morella............ X

VIRGINIA

Parris.................... X

Slaughter................. X

Wolf............... X

SENATE VOTES

BUDGET BLUEPRINT

By a vote of 66 for and 33 against, the Senate followed the House's lead (above) and adopted a long-term deficit cutting plan (H Con Res 310) designed to slow or halt the federal government's fiscal slide. Although this congressional budget resolution did not require President Bush's signature, the legislation produced by Democrat-controlled committees to implement it could become veto bait. Capitol Hill leaders set tomorrow as their most optimistic deadline for getting warring factions in Congress and the White House to clear the $500 billion, five-year attack on red ink. A yes vote supported the budget resolution.

................. Yes ... No ... NV

MARYLAND

Mikulski........... X

Sarbanes........... X

VIRGINIA

Robb............... X

Warner............. X

SOCIAL SECURITY

By a vote of 54 for and 44 against, the Senate fell short of the three-fifths majority it needed to waive Budget Act deficit limits and deal directly with a bill (S 3167) cutting Social Security taxes. By shaving the payroll tax rate by about one percent, the bill would gradually dry up Social Security trust fund surpluses. Supporters said the "pay as you go" approach would reaffirm that the trust funds are for those who pay into them and not for general deficit reduction. A yes vote was to move ahead on a bill making changes in Social Security including a cut in payroll taxes.

................. Yes ... No ... NV

MARYLAND

Mikulski........... X

Sarbanes........... X

VIRGINIA

Robb...................... X

Warner.................... X

SPENDING BILL

By a vote of 91 for and 7 against, the Senate sent to conference with the House a bill (HR 5021) appropriating $19.3 billion in fiscal 1991 for the federal judiciary, departments of Commerce, Justice and State and related agencies such as the U.S. Information Agency and U.S. Civil Rights Commission. This was an increase of about 12 percent over the comparable 1990 appropriations bill. A yes vote was to pass the bill.

................. Yes ... No ... NV

MARYLAND

Mikulski........... X

Sarbanes........... X

VIRGINIA

Robb............... X

Warner............. X

Compiled by Roll Call Report Syndicate