In last week's Prince William Weekly the proposed county taxi rate increases were incorrectly reported. The proposed increases are from $1 for the first one eighth of a mile to $1.50 for the first one ninth of a mile from 15 cents for each additional one eighth of a mile to 15 cents for each additional one ninth of a mile. (Published 10/25/ 90)

Prince William County

The following were among actions taken at the Oct. 9 meeting of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors. For more information, call 335-6600.

COMMUTER RAIL -- The Board of County Supervisors authorized county staff to issue $6.6 million in bonds to help finance the construction of stations and parking lots for the planned commuter rail service into the District. The service, expected to relieve rush hour congestion on interstates 66 and 95, is scheduled to begin next fall.

The board also agreed to issue an additional $2.5 million in bonds to finance the purchase of 15 new buses, which the county is now leasing for its commuter bus service. The county-operated service has 41 buses, including the 15 leased buses, which make roughly 32 round trips daily between the county and the Washington area.

The $6.6 million will fund the construction of three new commuter rail stations and three parking lots.

The sites for the new county stations are: near the Manassas Airport, north of Piper Lane; in Woodbridge, north of Dawson Beach Road; and near Rippon, at the south end of Farm Creek Drive.

There will be a fourth commuter rail stop at the existing rail station in Quantico on Potomac Avenue. In addition, the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park will each have a commuter rail station.

The county is constructing 300-car parking lots at the Rippon and airport stations and a 50-car parking lot for the Quantico station.

A 600-car parking garage, which will be funded separately out of the county's capital improvement budget, is planned for the Dawson Beach Road station. It is expected to cost about $5.5 million.

The bonds will be issued through the Potomac and Rhappahannock Transportation Commission (PRTC). The county's debt will be paid off with revenues from a 2 percent gas tax levied by the PRTC on Northern Virginia jurisdictions.

CHURCH -- The Board of Supervisors unanimously approved plans by Woodbridge Community Fellowship to build a church at Old Davis Ford and Russell roads, which some residents initially opposed because they said the structure would mar their neighborhood's rural character.

Before the vote, Supervisor Kathleen K. Seefeldt (Occoquan) said the church and local residents had agreed to changes in the construction plans, which resulted in a plan "workable and agreeable to both sides."

In addition to widening the planned buffer zones between the church and some residences, the church agreed to limit the size of its project to one 24,000-square-foot building. It will house the church and classrooms for Sunday school.

The church first proposed constructing three separate buildings, totaling 64,000 square feet.

TAXI RATES -- The board agreed to schedule a public hearing in November on proposed increases in county taxicab fares. The two taxicab companies based in the county have proposed raising fares from $1 to $1.50 for the first mile and $1.35 to $1.50 for additional miles. {For more details, see related story in today's Weekly.}

Town of Occoquan

The following were among actions taken at the Oct. 9 meeting of the Occoquan Town Council. For more information, call 491-1918.

ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD -- The Town Council, despite some differences of opinion, agreed to direct the town attorney to prepare an ordinance that would require town residency for members of the Architectural Review Board -- which regulates the exterior design of structures in the town's historical district. Town residency is a requirement for members of the Town Council and all other boards and commissions.

Some members of the council opposed the residency requirement, which would affect at least one person on the seven-member board. Board member Letty Lynn is not a resident, although she owns property in Occoquan. She was appointed to a second three-year term, ending in July 1992, by the previous council, whose terms expired June 31. The former review board chairman, architect Clifton L. Spence III, did not live in Occoquan. Spence, who served only one year, resigned this summer for personal reasons.

After the town attorney prepares the ordinance, a public hearing on the proposed requirement will be scheduled.

Opposing the residency requirement are Mayor LaVerne O. Carson and council members R.A. "Bob" Henry and Charles Pugh, according to council member Robby Mooney.

Said Mooney, who supports the requirement: "It's not appropriate for a non-resident to be imposing their will on a community when they don't live there . . . They {the non-residents} do not feel the ramifications of their decision."

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT -- The council postponed a decision on whether or not to participate in Prince William County's plan to reduce solid waste until it receives more information on the plan and any financial obligations it might involve, according to council member Robby Mooney.

Under state law, all Virginia towns, cities and counties must develop solid waste management plans by July 1991. Those plans must include provisions for recycling 25 percent of a locality's trash by 1995.

Under Prince William County's plan, several pilot voluntary curbside recylcing programs have been established in subdivisions within the county, and 18 collection bins have been installed for recyclables throughout the county. Prince William, which currently recycles about 6 percent of its trash, may eventually require participation in a county-wide recycling program.

The county recently invited Occoquan, which currently has no recycling program, and the towns of Quantico, Haymarket and Dumfries to participate in the solid waste management plan. The towns, which now contract with private companies for trash collection, use the county's sanitary landfill at Independent Hill.

The county would like to install recycling bins and eventually implement curbside recycling in each town, according to Deb Oliver, spokesperson for the county's Department of Solid Waste Management.

"We're trying to get the towns into a more active role and more committed to watching over their town's waste production and reduction," Oliver said.

Town of Quantico

The following were among actions taken at Oct. 11 meeting of the Quantico Town Council. For more information call 640-7411.

WATER AND SEWER -- The Town Council approved a 9.8 percent rate increase for the town's water and sewer service, passing on part of a rate increase by the U.S. Marine Corps base, which provides the town with water and sewage treatment.

The increase of 9.8 percent, or 55 cents per 1,000 gallons, brings the new rate to $6.15 per 1,000 gallons. Mayor Howard Bolognese warned, however, that the council may have to raise the rates again in the near future. It's the first water and sewer rate increase for town residents and businesses in four years.

The increase, now in effect, raises the monthly water and sewer bill by an estimated $3.43 for a three-person household, using an average of over 6,250 gallons per month. There is a minimum monthly bill of $6.40 cents.

The rate increase to town residents follows an 83-cent per 1,000 gallons rate increase charged by the Marine Corp base. Rather than pass on the full increase to consumers, the council agreed to use funds from the town's water and sewer budget to absorb part of the increased costs. The town fully absorbed the last increase, in September, 1988, which was 24 cents per 1,000 gallons.

The town has less than $36,000 in its current $154,792 water and sewer budget to absorb the rate increases for 167 units, both residences and businesses, using water and sewer.

The remainder of the water and sewer funds is set aside to pay $2,276 monthly payments on a $452,000 loan from the federal Farmers Home Adminstration {FHA} used to help finance installation of new water and sewer lines in the town from 1985 through 1987.

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT -- The council agreed to participate in Prince William County's regional plan to reduce solid waste, which depends largely on a voluntary countywide recycling program.

Under state law, all Virginia towns, cities and counties must develop solid waste management plans by next July. Those plans must include provisions for recycling 25 percent of a locality's trash by 1995.

Under the county plan, several pilot voluntary curbside recycling programs have been established in county subdivisions, and 18 collection bins have been installed for recyclable material throughout the county. Prince William currently recycles about 6 percent of its trash under the voluntary program, but may eventually have to make recycling mandatory to meet the state goals, county officials said.

The county has invited all four towns in the county to participate in the voluntary recycling program. It proposes to install recycling collection bins in the towns, which now have no recycling programs. The towns now contract separately for private trash collection, but use the county's sanitary landfill at Independent Hill.

Quantico is the first town to agree to partcipate in the county plan. Occoquan is considering it and Haymarket and Dumfries have not yet considered the proposal.

SKATEBOARD ORDINANCE -- The council, at its Nov. 8 meeting, agreed to consider an ordinance which would prohibit skateboarding on Potomac Avenue, where most town businesses are located.

Supporting the skateboarding prohibition, two business owners, Lois Hanson and Major Harry Elms, told the council that the skateboarders are a safety hazard to pedestrians using the sidewalks along Potomac Avenue.