The following is a report of how major bills fared in Congress last week and a record of how local members of Congress voted.

Maryland senators are Democrats Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski. Virginia senators are Republican John W. Warner and Democrat Charles S. Robb.

Maryland representatives to the House are Roy P. Dyson (D-1st), Benjamin L. Cardin (D-3rd), Tom McMillen (D-4th), Steny H. Hoyer (D-5th), Beverly B. Byron (D-6th), and Constance A. Morella (R-8th).

Virginia representatives are D. French Slaughter (R-7th), Stan Parris (R-8th), and Frank R. Wolf (R-10th).

NV means Not Voting.

TO PASS SPENDING BILL

By a vote of 335 for and 74 against, the House adopted the conference report on a bill (HR 5257) appropriating $182.2 billion in fiscal 1991 for the departments of Health and Human Services, Education and Labor and related agencies. The cost to taxpayers is more than 14 percent over the comparable 1990 bill. The budget for HHS will rise to $146.2 billion (up 17 percent), Education to $27.4 billion (up 13 percent) and Labor to $7.5 billion (up 11 percent). Though much higher than the year before, these budgets do not violate the five-year, $500 billion deficit-reduction legislation. This shows that the touted $300 million "savings" or "cuts" on the expenditure side of the deficit bill are not true reductions but only a slowing of planned spending growth. Only the post-Cold War defense budget among the 13 appropriations bills is lower in 1991 than in 1990. A yes vote supported the $182.2 billion appropriations bill.

.........Yes......No.......NV

Byron.....X

Hoyer.....X

Parris....X

Cardin....X

McMillen..X

Slaughter........X

Dyson.....X

Morella...X

Wolf......X

CONGRESS' OWN BUDGET

By a vote of 249 for and 161 against, the House cut 2 percent, about $35 million, from the fiscal 1991 budget for Congress and its agencies. The cut was made in proposed spending of about $1.74 billion for all congressional operations except the Senate, which later added its own budget. When the bill emerged from the Senate (below), its cost was $2.08 billion, about 5 percent over the comparable 1990 bill. Salaries for lawmakers and staff, mailing costs, travel and expense accounts are among the hundreds of items funded by the legislative branch appropriations bill (HR 5399). A yes vote was to cut Congress' own budget by 2 percent.

..........Yes......No.....NV

Byron.....X

Hoyer..............X

Parris....X

Cardin.............X

McMillen...........X

Slaughter.X

Dyson.....X

Morella...X

Wolf......X

'PORK BARREL'

By a vote of 232 for and 167 against, the House transferred $54 million destined for low-income housing to about five dozen special interest projects, most of which benefit the districts of members of the congressional appropriations committees. Critics said the community development projects were not requested by the Department of Housing and Urban Development or subjected to the authorization hurdle that is supposed to be cleared in advance of appropriations. A yes vote was to shift $54 million to the pet projects of certain members.

........Yes.....No.....NV

Yes No NV

Yes No NV

Byron...........X

Hoyer....X

Parris..........X

Cardin..........X

McMillen.X

Slaughter.......X

Dyson...........X

Morella..X

Wolf............X

DEFICIT REDUCTION

By a vote of 228 for and 200 against, the House approved the conference report on budget legislation (HR 5835) aimed at slowing deficit growth by about $490 billion over five years. Democrats voted 181 for and 74 against and Republicans 47 for and 126 against. Supporters said the measure would improve but not cure America's deficit problem. For example, red ink this fiscal year is projected to top $200 billion even after the bill trims it by $40 billion. The revenue side of HR 5835 is estimated at $189 billion. Upper income taxpayers will supply most of the tax yield as a result of curbs on their deductions and personal exemptions. Most other Americans will be touched by higher taxes on gasoline, alcoholic beverages, cigarettes and airline tickets, an expansion of the wage base for Medicare payroll taxes and other revenue measures. A defense slowdown of about $185 billion over five years is the bill's major spending restraint. Medicare curbs are estimated at $44 billion, about $10 billion of which will hit beneficiaries. Spending growth is curbed by $12 billion for farm subsidies, $7.6 billion for civil servant retirement benefits and $3.7 billion for veterans' benefits, among other restraints. A yes vote was to join the bipartisan leadership and President Bush in support of the deficit-reduction bill.

............Yes.....No....NV

Byron.......X

Hoyer.......X

Parris..............X

Cardin......X

McMillen....X

Slaughter...........X

Dyson...............X

Morella.....X

Wolf........X

GAY RIGHTS ISSUE

By a vote of 186 for and 210 against, during debate on the fiscal 1991 appropriations bill (HR 5311) for the District of Columbia, the House refused to narrow the D.C. law protecting homosexuals against discrimination. At issue was whether the House should accept Senate language permitting youth organizations such as Big Brothers to exclude gay men as monitors without violating the D.C. law. The vote left the gay rights law unchanged. A yes vote was to enable the Big Brothers organization in D.C. to bar gay men from leadership roles.

............Yes......No.....NV

Byron.......X

Hoyer................X

Parris......X

Cardin...............X

McMillen.............X

Slaughter...X

Dyson................X

Morella..............X

Wolf........X

CIVIL RIGHTS VETO

By a vote of 66 for and 34 against, the Senate failed to achieve the two-thirds majority needed to overturn President Bush's veto of a bill designed to strengthen federal law against discrimination in the workplace. Bush contended employers would have to adopt hiring and promotion quotas to avoid being sued by women, minorities and others the bill sought to protect. A yes vote supported the Civil Rights Act of 1990.

..........Yes.......No.....NV

Mikulski...X

Robb.......X

Sarbanes...X

Warner.............X

FEDERAL ARTS FUNDING

By a vote of 29 for and 70 against, the Senate refused to deny federal money for arts projects that "depict or describe, in a patently offensive way, sexual or excretory activities or organs." The amendment was offered to legislation funding the National Endowment of the Arts. As later approved as part of HR 5769, a fiscal 1991 appropriations bill, the measure leaves obscenity judgments to the courts. But it requires artists to repay grants if courts rule they have run afoul of obscenity or child pornography laws. A yes vote was to crack down on NEA funding of sexually explicit art.

..........Yes......No....NV

Mikulski...........X

Robb...............X

Sarbanes...........X

Warner.............X

TO CUT CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET

By a vote of 32 for and 60 against, the Senate failed to table (kill) an amendment cutting 5 percent from the legislative branch appropriations bill (HR 5399) for fiscal 1991 (see House vote above). The breakdown for fiscal 1991 is $646.7 million for the House, $420.5 million for the Senate, $365.1 million for joint congressional operations and $645.3 million for support agencies such as the Library of Congress. A yes vote opposed a 5 percent cut in the legislative branch budget.

...........Yes.......No......NV

Mikulski....X

Robb.................X

Sarbanes....X

Warner...............X

TO CURB DEFICIT

By a vote of 54 for and 45 against, the Senate sent to President Bush for his signature the mammoth budget reconciliation bill (HR 5835) designed to slow deficit growth by $490 billion between fiscal 1991-95 through tax increases and spending restraints. A yes vote supported the deficit reduction package.

..........Yes......No......NV

Mikulski...X

Robb.......X

Sarbanes...X

Warner.....X