The obituary of Louise Syphax Hopkins, 83, on Nov. 10 incorrectly reported that she had managed the Hopkins Theater in Wilmington, Del. She never managed the theater, which closed in 1959. (Published 11/20/90)

Philip E. Ryan, 79, a retired congressional liaison officer with the Department of Housing and Urban Development who had worked for the American Red Cross during World War II and the International Refugee Organization in the late 1940s, died Nov. 6 at a hospital in Winchester, Va., after a heart attack. He lived in Berryville, Va.

Mr. Ryan served as director of civilian relief for the American Red Cross during World War II, serving in Europe and the Philippines. He served here as director of the Red Cross's international activities from 1946 until 1948, when he was appointed chief of International Refugee Organization operations in the American zone in Germany. In 1951, he went to Korea as a civilian liaison with the United Nations Civilian Administration.

From 1952 until 1965, he worked in New York City for the National Health Council and then the National Association for Mental Health. He then returned here and joined HUD, where he was a public housing specialist and community services director before retiring as a congressional liaison officer in 1978.

In 1979, he received the Whitney M. Young award from the Boy Scouts of America.

Mr. Ryan was born in Connecticut and grew up in New York City. He graduated from Fordham University and received a master's degree in social work from the University of Notre Dame.

He was executive director of the National Committee on the Care of Transient and Homeless in New York City before coming here and joining the Red Cross in 1939.

Survivors include his wife, Marianne M. Ryan of Berryville; two sons, Philip M., of Hopewell Junction, N.Y., and Peter M., of Berryville; two brothers, Gerald R., of New City, N.Y., and Joseph J., of Chateaugay, N.Y.; two sisters, Rosalie Youngquest of Maitland, Fla., and Sister Bernadetta Ryan of St. Mary-of-the-Woods, Ind.; and three grandchildren.

MARY M. GOUDREAU

Nursing Educator

Mary M. Goudreau, 80, a retired nursing arts department chairman of the old Capital City School of Nursing at D.C. General Hospital, died Nov. 7 at Doctors' Community Hospital in Lanham after surgery for a perforated ulcer. She lived in Takoma Park.

She joined the staff of the Capital City School in 1938 when it was part of the old Gallinger Hospital. She served as a department chairman there from the late 1940s until retiring in 1968. She had taught courses dealing with nursing traditions and ethics.

In the early 1970s, she had been a consultant to the World Health Organization.

Mrs. Goudreau, who was a native of Staunton, Va., came here to attend nursing school. She graduated from the nursing school at Providence Hospital in Washington in 1931. She later received a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in nursing education at Catholic University.

Her first husband, Ashley L. Hawken Sr., died in 1937.

Survivors include her husband of 46 years, Vincent A. Goudreau Sr. of Takoma Park; a son by her first marriage, Ashley Jr., of Arlington; a son by her second marriage, Vincent Jr., of Wheaton; a sister, Margaret E. Onesty of Charlottesville; a brother, Dennis M. Mitchell of Vista, Calif.; and two grandchildren.

LOUISE SYPHAX HOPKINS

Businesswoman

Louise Syphax Hopkins, 83, a retired Wilmington, Del., businesswoman, died of heart ailments Oct. 28 at Howard University Hospital

Mrs. Hopkins was born in Jersey City and came to Washington as an infant. She graduated from Dunbar High School and Miner Teachers College and had done graduate study in psychology at New York University. As a young woman she had acted in theatrical productions in Washington.

In 1947 she moved to Wilmington, where she helped her husband, John O. Hopkins Jr., manage a family business, the Hopkins Theatre. After his death in 1980, she managed the movie theater herself until retiring in 1984. She returned to Washington in 1986.

In the 1960s, she had participated in civil rights protest marches in Wilmington.

Survivors include two children, Lynn Bumbray Collins and John O. Hopkins III, and two brothers, William C. Syphax and Dr. Burke Syphax, all of Washington; and three grandchildren.

JOSEPH E. SWADLEY

Waiter

Joseph Edward Swadley, 40, a waiter at the River Club restaurant in Washington, died Nov. 7 at George Washington University Hospital. He had AIDS.

Mr. Swadley, who lived in Washington, was a native of Hot Springs, Va. He graduated from James Madison University.

He came to Washington in 1975 and worked as a waiter in several restaurants and hotels. From 1984 to 1987, he worked as a waiter in New York City. He then returned here and taught cooking classes and worked as a food and beverage consultant to restaurants. He had been working at the River Club since 1988.

Survivors include his brother, Landon Swadley of Summerville, S.C.; two sisters, Collie Ryder of Mountain Grove, Va., and Carol Swadley of Hot Springs.

JOHN J. HURLEY

Circulation Contractor

John Joseph Hurley, 73, a retired independent circulation contractor who worked for The Washington Post and an area businessman who operated a charter bus company and a riding stable, died at Washington Adventist Hospital Nov. 8 after a heart attack. He had cancer.

Mr. Hurley, who lived in Beltsville, was a Washington native. In the late 1930s, he started working as an independent circulation contractor for the Times-Herald newspaper, making deliveries at Washington newsstands.

During World War II, he served in the Navy.

When the Post bought the Times-Herald in 1954, he worked as a circulation contractor in Montgomery and Prince George's counties for The Post. About that time, he also started a charter bus company in Beltsville.

He retired from his circulation job in 1968 and bought the Edgewater Riding Academy in Rock Creek Park. He closed his bus company in 1970 and sold his stable in 1973.

Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Mary C. Hurley of Beltsville; two sons, James J. Hurley of Monrovia, Md., and William F. Hurley of Hagerstown, Md.; a sister, Mary Rita Kehoe of Washington; and eight grandchildren.

EVELYN M. MIKA

Office Manager

Evelyn M. Mika, 65, an office manager with the Watergate at Landmark condominium development in Alexandria from 1975 to 1980, died Nov. 8 at University of Maryland Hospital in Baltimore. Mrs. Mika, who lived in Ocean City, Md., was in the hospital for treatment of an brain aneurysm.

Mrs. Mika, a former Springfield resident, was a native of Mahanoy City, Pa. She had accompanied her husband to Army assignments in Europe and El Paso before coming here in 1963. She moved to Ocean City in 1980.

During her years here, she was active in swim groups. She was a member of the booster club of the Starlit Aquatic Club in Springfield. She helped organize and direct swim meets at the club.

Survivors include her husband of 44 years, Stanley A. Mika of Ocean City; five daughters, Ellen Mica of Belmont, Mass., Marcella Mica of Englewood, Fla., Jane Singleton of Woodbridge, Sally Horne of Glen Burnie and Julie Birch of Manassas; her mother, Julia C. Wichalonis of Mahanoy City; a brother, Robert Wichalonis of Jonesboro, Ark.; a sister, Mildred Anthony of Frackville, Pa.; and nine grandchildren.

JEAN SPAULDING

Teacher

Jean Spaulding, 89, a former English teacher at Marjorie Webster Junior College and Maret School in Washington, died Nov. 8 at Bethesda Nursing Home in Chevy Chase. She had Alzheimer's disease.

Mrs. Spaulding, who lived in Washington, was born in Milwaukee. She graduated from Milwaukee Downer College and received a master's degree in English from the University of Chicago.

Before moving to the Washington area in 1930, she taught at North Carolina Women's College and Kalamazoo College in Michigan. In this area, she taught at Maret from the mid-1930s to the mid-1940s

From 1949 to 1955, she taught school in Austria while her husband was assigned there by the State Department.

Upon returning to Washington, she joined the faculty at Marjorie Webster and continued teaching there until the school closed in 1971. She also was librarian there and at Maret.

Mrs. Spaulding worked as a volunteer at the Smithsonian Institution's Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

Survivors include her husband, E. Wilder Spaulding of Washington; and a sister, Henrietta Cattell of Encinetas, Calif.

ROSA B. KEITH

Church Member

Rosa Belle Keith, 92, a retired elevator operator for the Department of Labor who was a choir member and volunteer practical nurse at Metropolitan AME Church in Washington, died Nov. 4 of an intestinal obstruction at a hospital in Texarkana, Tex.

Mrs. Keith, who had lived in Texarkana since leaving Washington in 1986, was born in South Carolina and grew up in Jacksonville, Fla. She came to Washington in 1934 as an elevator operator with the Labor Department. She retired in 1964.

She was a founding member and past president of the International Hostesses and Models of Culture and Charm, a Washington woman's organization. She also was a consultant to the Devore School of Charm in Washington. Mrs. Keith's hobbies included writing poetry and songs.

Her marriage to Leroy Edwards ended in divorce. Her son, Rudolph Keith, died in 1972. Survivors include a sister, Estelle Spigner of Nash, Tex.; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

PEARL ALEXANDER

Active in Clubs

Pearl Alexander, 86, a Washington resident for 65 years before moving to New Hampshire in 1987 who had been active in Washington social groups, died of pneumonia Nov. 8 at a hospital in Hanover, N.H. She lived in Springfield, N.H.

She had been a member of the National Press, Capitol Hill, Women's Republican, American Newpaper Women's, Kenmore Country, and Washington clubs.

Mrs. Alexander was a native of Pennsylvania and a graduate of George Washington University. She had written for several area volunteer organizations over the years. She also served on the inaugural committees for presidents Eisenhower and Nixon.

Her husband, Dr. Samuel A. Alexander, died in the mid-1970s. Survivors include a son, Samuel A., of Springfield; a sister, Sophie Evans of Tampa; 12 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

LELAND S. TALBOTT

Secret Service Officer

Leland S. Talbott, 81, a retired captain with the Secret Service uniformed division, died of cancer Nov. 8 at a hospital in Clearwater, Fla.

Mr. Talbott, who lived in Dunedin, Fla., was a native of Ohio. He came to the Washington area about 1928. He worked at several jobs, including as a streetcar driver, before joining the D.C. police about 1938. He went to the Secret Service uniformed division in 1940. In 1965, he retired for health reasons and moved to Louisa, Va. In 1976, he moved to Florida.

Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Carolyn V. Talbott of Dunedin; four children, Edward Talbott of Arlington, Richard Talbott of Vienna, Carol Ann Carpenter of McLean and Sharon Ayres of Velencia, Calif.; a brother, Pete Talbott of Boise, Idaho; nine grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.