DUE TO INCORRECT INFORMATION PROVIDED BY FAIRFAX COUNTY SCHOOL OFFICIALS, AN ARTICLE SUNDAY INCORRECTLY REPORTED THE SALARY OF FAIRFAX SUPERINTENDENT DANIEL A. DOMENECH. DOMENECH'S ANNUAL SALARY IS $159,000. (PUBLISHED 06/29/99)

Fairfax County School Superintendent Daniel A. Domenech would get a $25,000 pay raise under a plan proposed yesterday by the School Board, which also would link future pay increases to student performance, the board's chairman said.

A pay raise for Domenech still faces a vote by board members who met behind closed doors yesterday to evaluate the superintendent and other members of the school district's leadership team. The board plans to discuss the proposal at its July 8 meeting and vote on the increase in public session.

Board members said they believe that Domenech has done an outstanding job in his 18 months as head of the Washington area's largest school district and that a pay increase is warranted.

During his tenure, Domenech has taken several steps intended to boost student performance, including setting specific targets for the 150,000-student system. Most recently, he devised a plan to provide extra staff, money and materials to 20 schools with low standardize test scores.

In exchange for the extra help, the schools will be expected to meet specific academic goals or face a change in administration and staff.

"We feel that a salary adjustment is warranted--both based on his performance and to remain competitive with what he could command elsewhere," said board Chairman Robert E. Frye Sr. (At Large).

Domenech currently receives a base salary of about $150,000 a year. The proposed increase would bring his salary to about $175,000.

Between now and July 8, board members will work with Domenech to develop a performance-based evaluation system for 2000-2001, Frye said. Under such a plan, Domenech's pay would be tied to how well he meets a set of yet-to-be-established goals. For example, those goals could tie his pay to Fairfax student performance on the state Standards of Learning exams or to how well the district meets targets set by the board.

Increasingly, as school districts move toward raising academic standards for students, administrators' pay is being tied to student performance.

Newly hired Prince George's Superintendent Iris T. Metts will be paid an annual base salary of $160,000 under her four-year contract, but she will be eligible for thousands of dollars in bonuses if she produces results in a number of areas, including improving student test scores and closing the achievement gap between black and white students.

Alexandria Superintendent Herbert Berg will receive a $30,000 bonus in four years if student test scores citywide improve to a certain level.

Domenech became Fairfax superintendent Jan. 1, 1998, after working to improve the academic performance of low-income children throughout a long career in public education on New York's Long Island.