THE OBITUARY JULY 14 ABOUT HYMAN J. ZIMMERMAN SHOULD HAVE SAID THAT HE WAS A DISTINGUISHED SCIENTIST AT THE ARMED FORCES INSTITUTE OF PATHOLOGY FROM 1989 TO 1992 AND A VISITING SCIENTIST THERE FROM 1992 UNTIL HIS DEATH. (PUBLISHED 07/15/99)

Hyman J. Zimmerman, 84, the former chief of medicine at Veterans Affairs Hospital in Washington and one of the world's leading authorities on toxic liver injury, died July 12 at Suburban Hospital. He had cancer.

Dr. Zimmerman was the author of "Hepatotoxicity," the leading textbook on liver toxicity. He also wrote 309 articles in medical and peer review journals, published 63 chapters and edited several books and seminar reports. He had been a visiting professor and guest lecturer at universities throughout the United States and around the world.

He was chief of medicine at the VA Hospital in Washington from 1971 to 1978, and in this period also was a professor of medicine at George Washington University and a clinical professor of medicine at Georgetown University.

Later he was a senior clinician at the VA hospital and from 1980 to 1984 he was a professor of medicine and director of gastroenterology at George Washington University. Subsequent positions included a clinical professorship at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesda and distinguished physician at the VA Hospital.

In the medical community, Dr. Zimmerman was known both for his expertise in liver toxicity and as a mentor and teacher to hundreds of physicians who had trained under his tutelage.

A resident of Bethesda, he was born in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from the University of Rochester. He received a master's degree in bacteriology and his medical degree at Stanford University. During World War II, he was an Army doctor in France and later chief of an Army hospital.

He first came to Washington after the war as assistant medical resident at George Washington and Gallinger Hospitals. Later he was chief resident at those institutions. In the late 1940s he had a private medical practice in Washington and from 1949 to 1951 was assistant chief of medicine at the VA medical center here.

In the 1950s and early 1960s he served at VA hospitals in Omaha and Chicago and also taught at medical schools in those cities.

He returned to Washington in 1965 and served here until 1968 as chief of the liver and metabolic research laboratory at the VA medical center, and he also taught at George Washington University.

From 1968 to 1971 he was chief of medicine at the VA medical center in Boston and also served on the medical school faculties of Tufts and Boston universities.

His wife, Katherine Zimmerman, died about 10 years ago, and a son, Robert Zimmerman, died about five years ago.

Survivors include three children, Philip of Connecticut, Diane Zimmerman of Bethesda and David Zimmerman of Glenelg; and three grandchildren.