A STORY YESTERDAY ABOUT A LAWSUIT FILED BY FORMER PRISON PSYCHOLOGIST ELIZABETH L. FEIL AGAINST HER LONGTIME COMPANION, GLENN BOSSHARD, MISSTATED THE NUMBER OF LETTERS HE SAID HE SENT TO HER AFTER THE PRISON BREAK SHE IS ACCUSED OF AIDING. THE CORRECT NUMBER IS FOUR OR FIVE.

A former prison psychologist charged with helping two felons escape from a Jessup prison has filed a $4.35 million suit against her longtime companion, alleging that he violated her privacy, threatened her and repeatedly harassed her during the chaotic weeks after the prison break.

In the suit filed Monday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, Elizabeth L. Feil alleges that information about her that was given to the media by the companion, Glenn Bosshard, was "not of valid concern to the public."

Shortly after the escape, Bosshard told the media that Feil had carried on an affair with one of the escapees, Bryon L. Smoot, 38, a convicted armed robber. At the time, Bosshard said he was motivated by anger and a desire to see Feil punished. He also gave state police hundreds of pages of documents about the alleged love affair and Feil's personal life, and he provided material to the media as well.

Feil's attorney, J. Shawn Alcarese, said his client was especially troubled that Bosshard had turned over her college diary and pages from her parents' divorce proceedings.

"They belong to her," Alcarese said. "How would you like it if these private details about your life were published?"

Police have alleged that Feil, 43, picked up the two convicts after they scaled fences at the medium-security Maryland Correctional Institute in Jessup and then drove them to a Baltimore hotel. She is charged with two counts of harboring a fugitive, two counts of acting as an accessory after the fact and obstruction of justice. Her trial is scheduled for Oct. 7.

Bosshard, 44, said yesterday that the lawsuit was an attempt by Feil to divert attention from the charges against her.

"We've suffered enough from her continued manipulation of the legal system," he said.

Bosshard's attorney, David Fischer, said he plans to assert that Feil lost standard privacy protections after she became a public figure in the case. Fisher also said Bosshard, who is unemployed and on disability because of a chronic illness, is unable to pay the $1.85 million in compensatory and $2.5 million in punitive damages the suit seeks.

Feil's suit also alleges that Bosshard denied her access to her possessions, destroyed many of her possessions, assaulted her, took $691.50 from her bank account and repeatedly sent threatening letters.

The suit also alleges that Bosshard tried to harm her when she attempted to collect her belongings. It also says that he saw her one day while driving and deliberately crashed into her car in an attempt to injure her. In that incident, Bosshard was charged with misdemeanor assault, and a hearing in that case is scheduled for Sept. 27.

Bosshard acknowledged sending Feil "50 to 60" letters, some of them harshly worded, after the prison break. But he has contended that the letters did not represent threats. "Any man that has gone through what I've gone through is bound to say some things that are not nice," he said.

Bosshard and Feil were not legally married, but they had a religious wedding ceremony several years ago.

The escape has resulted in major changes in prison security and almost a dozen disciplinary actions.