THE DISTRICT

Man, 22, Fatally Shot in SE

A 22-year-old man was shot to death early Sunday in Southeast Washington, D.C. police said.

About 4:30 a.m., police responded to reports of a shooting in the 1200 block of Sumner Road SE. They found a man lying in the street with multiple gunshot wounds. The man was transported to D.C. General Hospital and declared dead shortly after 5 a.m.

Police identified him as Charles Albert Brown III and said he lived near the site of the shooting.

The case is under investigation. Police ask anyone with information about the shooting to call 202-727-9099.

Officer Fires After Hit-Run in NE

A D.C. police officer fired at a car outside a nightclub in Northeast Washington early yesterday after the vehicle struck a pedestrian, D.C. police said.

Police said the incident occurred shortly after 3 a.m. while officers were directing traffic in the 2300 block of Bladensburg Road.

The woman was struck once by the car, police said, and it appeared to an officer that the vehicle was going to strike her again. The officer, who was not identified, drew his pistol and fired a shot.

The pedestrian, whose name was not available, refused medical attention, authorities said. The car was later found abandoned, police said. It was unclear whether the vehicle or its driver was hit, they said.

MARYLAND

Man Charged in Easton Death

Maryland State Police have charged a Talbot County man in the death of a woman whose body was discovered Saturday in an abandoned house.

Tracy L. Skinner, 29, of Easton was charged early yesterday with first- and second-degree murder and first-degree assault, authorities said. He is being held without bond at the Talbot County Detention Center.

Troopers said Skinner surrendered shortly after police secured the crime scene on Royal Oak Road in Easton, where the body of Barbara L. Winston, 40, was found. Police said that Skinner and Winston argued shortly after midnight Thursday and that the victim had ridden with Skinner in his car. Investigators believe Winston was slain Friday.

Police are continuing their investigation and await the results of an autopsy by the state medical examiner.

Bridge Walk Canceled Over Police Use

The annual Chesapeake Bay Bridge Walk has been canceled this year because of concerns that the event would divert hundreds of police officers from increased homeland security duties.

The walk, which allows participants to cross the 4.3-mile span, is in its 29th year. It was scheduled for May 4 and was expected to draw 50,000 people. The event has been canceled only twice before. Last year and in 1980, organizers called off the walk when heavy rain and gusting winds threatened participants' safety.

Maryland Transportation Authority officials worried that security for this year's event could drain police resources at a time when officers are spending more time responding to the nation's heightened threat of terrorism.

More than 300 MTA police officers join other federal, state and local police in providing security for the event.

VIRGINIA

State College Costs Top $10,000

A year of schooling for an in-state student living on campus will top $10,000 for the first time at two state-supported Virginia colleges this fall as a result of recently approved rate increases.

At meetings Friday, the governing boards at Old Dominion University in Norfolk and Mary Washington College in Fredericksburg approved fall increases for tuition and fees.

Old Dominion will increase tuition and fees by 15 percent to nearly $5,000 a year for in-state students. A 2.5 percent increase in room and board brings the total annual cost for in-state students up to $10,408.

Mary Washington's Board of Visitors approved a 5.5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state students and a 6.9 percent increase for out-of-state students. In-state students will pay $10,166 a year, including tuition, fees, and room and board, and out-of-state students will pay $17,914, an increase of $964.

The cost comparisons for both schools include midyear tuition surcharges to counteract budget slashing by Gov. Mark R. Warner (D) last fall. At Old Dominion, the student surcharge was $180; at Mary Washington, it was $510.

This year, the University of Virginia approved an 11.2 percent tuition and fee increase for the fall, and Virginia Tech voted to raise its rates by 9 percent.

Mary Washington Alumni Like Name

Mary Washington College alumni favor keeping "Mary Washington" in the name when the school becomes a university, a survey commissioned by the college found.

"Mary Washington University" beat the second choice, "Washington & Monroe University," by nearly 2 to 1 in a survey of about 2,000 alumni, consultant Lorna Whalen told a committee studying the name change.

College officials want a new name as an umbrella for the state-supported school's residential campus in Fredericksburg, its James Monroe Center for Graduate and Professional Studies in Stafford County and any colleges it might open. The committee will make a recommendation in November; the Board of Visitors is expected to vote in December.

Va. Man Charged in Park Shooting

A 23-year-old Woodbridge man was arrested and charged in a shooting that left two people wounded Saturday night in the parking lot of Kings Dominion park, the Hanover County sheriff's office said.

David Gleason McKoy was charged with two counts of malicious wounding and two counts of possessing a firearm in the commission of a felony. Lt. Doug Goodman said the shooting occurred nearly an hour after the park closed. The two male victims, whose identities were not released, were being treated for their injuries at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond.

The shooting reportedly occurred over a vehicle collision in the parking lot, Goodman said. He said all the individuals involved knew each other.

"Day laborers are very vulnerable. It's a sad situation. It amounts to slave labor. Nobody thinks this is appropriate, but the challenge is how to address it."

-- Montgomery County State's Attorney Douglas F. Gansler, on the difficulty of stopping the exploitation of immigrant laborers, who often don't get paid by unscrupulous contractors. -- Page B1

Compiled from reports by staff writers Elaine Rivera, Rosalind S. Helderman and Martin Weil and the Associated Press.