Thursday 16

DESERTS TALK, Michael A. Mares, director of the Oklahoma State Museum at the University of Oklahoma, discusses studying nature in deserts, noon, National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

LATINO CENTER, Anna Escovedo-Cabral, director of the Smithsonian Center for Latino Initiatives, discusses the history of the center and its purpose, noon, Library of Congress, Madison Building, Dining Room A, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-3702.

AFRICAN MUSIC AND DANCE, the Kusun Ensemble, from Ghana, West Africa, 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Grand Foyer, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

HAITIAN NOVEL, Edwidge Danticat discusses her book "The Dew Breaker," about an immigrant in the United States who formerly worked as a prison guard in Haiti, torturing prisoners, 7 p.m., National Museum of American History, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free; reservations recommended. 202-287-3382.

Friday 17

EGYPT ARCHAEOLOGY LECTURE, Egyptologist Peter Der Manuelian discusses the 1905-1942 Egypt expedition of archaeologist George Reisner, when hundreds of ancient tombs were unearthed, 6:30 p.m., Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, 1619 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-663-5676.

AUTHOR'S TALK, Vendela Vida discusses her novel "And Now You Can Go," about a woman whose life is changed by a man who confronts her at gunpoint, 7 p.m., National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. $10; ages 60 and older, $8; students, $5. 202-783-7370.

KOREAN FILM, "Woman Is the Future of Man" (2004), about a filmmaker and an art professor who seek a woman whom they both dated years before, in Korean with English subtitles, 7 p.m., Freer Gallery of Art, Meyer Auditorium, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

POETRY READINGS, Piri Thomas, Martin Espada, Willie Perdomo and others read from their works, 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Gallery, 2700 F St. NW. $10. 202-467-4600.

"QUINTUPLES" PLAY, Idalia Perez Garay and Jose Felix Gomez star in Luis Rafael Sanchez's six-monologue satire, 8 p.m.; the playwright discusses his work, 6:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Film Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $20. 202-467-4600.

Saturday 18

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FESTIVAL, for all ages, visitors help construct a brick wall, thatch a roof, can climb on a concrete mixer and participate in "House of Cards," a game about building design; host Kevin O'Connor and master carpenter Norm Abram from the TV show "This Old House" offer home improvement advice, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Suggested donation, $5. 202-272-2448.

AFRICAN ART COMMUNITY DAY, African music, dance, games, food samples, folk tales and art activities, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m., National Museum of African Art, 950 Independence Ave. SW. Free. 202-633-4600.

CHILEAN WEAVINGS, artists Luisa Malio and Mercedes Cona demonstrate how to weave, 10:30 a.m., Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. Free. 202-667-0441.

ARTS ON FOOT FESTIVAL, art, music, theater, dance, film, children's programs, samples of food from area restaurants and sale of costumes from Ford's Theatre and props from Warehouse Theater, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., National Archives; Canadian Embassy; Warehouse, Warner and National theaters; National Gallery of Art; Bead Museum; and other sites, Fourth and 14th streets NW, from L Street to Pennsylvania Avenue. Free; events booklet available from merchants on the day of the festival. 202-482-7271 or www.artsonfoot.org.

CLEVELAND PARK USED-BOOK SALE, noon-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Cleveland Park branch library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-3080.

"CANSTRUCTION" AWARDS, teams of architects, engineers and contractors who created giant structures using food cans will be given awards for their designs, spectators are invited to help take down the structures, and canned food will be donated to the Capital Area Food Bank, 12:30 p.m., the Mall at 2000 Penn, 2000 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free; reservations required. 202-667-1798.

BIKE TOUR, a National Park Service ranger leads a tour along the Mall, bring a bike, water and a helmet, 1-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, through Nov. 7, meet at Thomas Jefferson Memorial Plaza, West Potomac Park, Tidal Basin Stage. Free. 202-438-4391.

SPORTS BOOKS DISCUSSION, baseball player Al Burrows, football coach Paul "Doc" Hines and authors Cheryl Robinson and Paula Hines Lonergan discuss famous athletes, 1-5 p.m., Anacostia Museum, 1901 Fort Pl. SE. Free; reservations recommended. 202-610-3292.

POETRY READING, Marjorie Sadin reads from her works, 2 p.m., West End branch library, 1101 24th St. NW. Free. 202-724-8707.

ROCK CREEK PARK HIKE, for ages 7 and older, a park ranger leads a three-mile hike to Rapids Bridge, 2 p.m., Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Rd. NW. Free. 202-895-6070.

WOOD FURNITURE, artist Stephen Courtney discusses his furniture pieces, 3 p.m. Saturday; artist John Cox demonstrates how to apply decorative finishes, 1 p.m. Sunday, Renwick Gallery, 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

AFRICAN MASQUERADES, curator David Binkley discusses how masquerades play a role in ceremonies in the Republic of the Congo, 3 p.m., National Museum of African Art, 950 Independence Ave. SW. Free. 202-633-4600.

CHILDREN'S THEATER, members of Red Sky perform Tomson Highway's "Caribou Song" and Maria Williams's and Felix Vigil's "How the Raven Stole the Sun," 3:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. Free; tickets required. 202-467-4600.

LATIN JAZZ CONCERT, alto saxophonist Miguel Zenon and his quartet, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $25. 202-467-4600.

ASTRONOMY, a park ranger and members of the National Capital Astronomers demonstrate how to view stars, planets and other phenomena using telescopes, 8 p.m., Rock Creek Park, Military Field, near Picnic Groves 13 and 14, Military Road NW. Free. 202-895-6070.

Sunday 19

ZOO FIESTA MUSICAL, live music and dance performances, puppet shows, Hispanic food and crafts and discussion of animals native to Latin America, to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., National Zoological Park, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-673-4821.

ARCHITECT DOCUMENTARY, "First Person Singular: I.M. Pei," in which the architect of the National Gallery's East Building discusses his roots in China and his famous clients, including Jacqueline Kennedy and Francois Mitterand, 1 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Free. 202-272-2448.

KOREAN FILM, "A Flower in Hell" (1958), a melodrama about a Korean prostitute's relationship with a U.S. soldier, in Korean with English subtitles, 2 p.m., Freer Gallery of Art, Meyer Auditorium, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

ORGAN RECITAL, Scott Bennett, 5 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Massachusetts and Wisconsin avenues NW. Free. 202-537-6200.

LARRY REDHOUSE JAZZ TRIO, concert, 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Gallery, 2700 F St. NW. Free; tickets required. 202-467-4600.

AIR FORCE BAND CHAMBER PLAYERS, concert, 8 p.m., Georgetown University, Gaston Hall, 37th and O streets NW. Free. 202-767-5658.

Monday 20

BEETHOVEN'S HEARING LOSS, composer Jay Alan Zimmerman discusses the paradox of a composer losing his hearing and performs Beethoven's works at various stages of the loss, noon, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-2142.

VIRGINIA HISTORY TALK, Rhys Isaac discusses Landon Carter's biography, "Uneasy Kingdom: Revolution Rebellion on a Virginia Plantation," about the Virginia planter who lived during the American Revolution and left a detailed diary, 1 p.m., National Archives, Seventh Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Free; reservations required. 202-501-5000.

AMERICAN MUSIC HISTORY, composer Jack Gottlieb discusses his book "Funny, It Doesn't Sound Jewish: How Yiddish Songs and Synagogue Melodies Influenced Tin Pan Alley, Broadway and Hollywood," 6 p.m., Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Whittall Pavilion, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-5503.

VEGETARIAN MEALS, dietitian Doron Peterson discusses how to add vegetarian meals to the diet, 7 p.m., Georgetown branch library, 3260 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-0220.

STAND-UP COMEDY, by Don Burnstick and Charlie Hill, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Gallery, 2700 F St. NW. Free; tickets required. 202-467-4600.

ZIONISM HISTORY, historian Brigitte Hamann discusses Theodor Herzl, a playwright and journalist who created modern political Zionism, light refreshments served, 7:30 p.m., Embassy of Austria, 3524 International Ct. NW. Free; reservations required. 202-895-6776.

Tuesday 21

AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM OPENING, a procession of Native Americans in traditional clothing, 9:30 a.m.-noon, starting at the Smithsonian Castle, 1000 Jefferson Dr. SW; opening ceremony with remarks by museum director W. Richard West, noon, in front of the Capitol; concerts and hymn singing, 1-5:30 p.m. Tuesday and 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sept. 22-26, in front of the Capitol; performances by Rita Coolidge, Buffy Sainte-Marie and others, 5:30-9 p.m. Tuesday; displays of crafts during the entire event, National Museum of the American Indian, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

CLASSICAL VOCAL RECITAL, mezzo-soprano Bailey Whiteman, 12:10 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 13th and G streets NW. Free. 202-347-2635, Ext. 18.

CERAMIC SCULPTURE, artist Paloma Torres, sculptor Margaret Boozer, museum director Agustin Arteaga and Sculpture magazine Managing Editor Twylene Moyer discuss the art of ceramic sculpture in Mexico and the United States, 6:30 p.m., Cultural Institute of Mexico, 2829 16th St. NW. Free. 202-232-8674.

JAZZ FLUTE RECITAL, Bolivian flutist Juan Lazaro Mendolas and a Latin jazz quartet perform original compositions, 6:30 p.m., Inter-American Development Bank, 1300 New York Ave. NW. Free. 202-623-3929.

RESEARCHING D.C. BUILDINGS, a museum staff member discusses research techniques and materials for learning about Washington buildings, including historic maps, city directories, government records, photographs and various publications, 6:30-8:30 p.m., City Museum of Washington, D.C., 801 K St. NW. $10. 202-383-1850.

ARCHITECTURE TALK, Tulane University architecture professor Karen Kingsley discusses the works of architects Nathaniel C. Curtis and Arthur Q. Davis, 7 p.m.; reception, 6:30 p.m., American Institute of Architects, second-floor boardroom, 1735 New York Ave. NW. $12; students, $8. 703-280-1107.

SHAKESPEARE TALK, Dana Gioia, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, and John Andrews, president of the Shakespeare Guild, discuss Gioia's interest in bringing the playwright's works to every town in the country, 7 p.m., Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW. $16. 202-639-1770.

KOREAN FILM, "Jealousy Is My Middle Name" (2003), about love triangles, revenge and jealousy, in Korean with English subtitles, 7 p.m., National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. $6; ages 60 and older, $5. 202-783-7370.

Wednesday 22

BIGOTRY DISCUSSION, African American artists Ashley Bryan, Wil Clay, Pat Cummings, Tom Feelings and Jerry Pinkney discuss the bigotry that they perceive in children's books, advertising, films and other media, 10:30 a.m., Anacostia Museum, 1901 Fort Pl. SE. Free; reservations recommended. 202-610-3292.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS GALLERY TOUR, Michael Grunberger, head of the library's Hebraic Section and curator of the exhibit "From Haven to Home," leads a tour of the exhibit, noon, Jefferson Building, Northwest Gallery, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-9203.

NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY, lawyer Elizabeth T. Walker and Native Americans Kenneth Adams, Steve Adkins and Wayne Adkins discuss "Sovereignty: The Virginia Tribes' Struggle for Federal Recognition," 4 p.m., Woodrow Wilson House, 2340 S St. NW. Free; reservations requested. 202-387-8391.

PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT RECEPTION, for works by Pierre Taminiaux, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; exhibit continues, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays or by appointment, through Nov. 10, Alliance Francaise, 2142 Wyoming Ave. NW. Free. 202-234-7911.

BOOK TALK, Jonetta Rose Barras discusses her book "Whatever Happened to Daddy's Little Girl? The Impact of Fatherlessness on Black Women," 7 p.m., Watha T. Daniel branch library, 1701 Eighth St. NW. Free. 202-671-0212.

LIBRARY CONSTRUCTION MEETINGS, library staff and representatives from Hess Construction discuss upcoming construction work at two libraries, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Watha T. Daniel branch library, 1701 Eighth St. NW, 202-671-0212, and 7 p.m. Sept. 23, Benning branch library, Benning Road near Minnesota Avenue NE. 202-724-4787. Free.

FOLGER POETRY READINGS, Thomas Sayers Ellis, Tony Hoagland, Fanny Howe and Vijay Seshadri read from their works, a reception follows, 7:30 p.m., Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. $10. 202-544-7077.

AIR FORCE BAND CLARINET QUARTET, concert, 8 p.m., Georgetown University, McNeir Hall, 37th and O streets NW. Free. 202-767-5658.

Thursday 23

CATHEDRAL WOODS WALKS, a staff member leads a bird walk through Olmsted Woods, 8:30 a.m., meet at the George Washington statue on Pilgrim Road; a representative of the All Hallows Guild leads a walk, discussing the woods' restoration and other urban forests, wear sturdy waterproof shoes, 10 a.m., meet at the Garfield Street entrance to the woods, grounds of Washington National Cathedral, Massachusetts and Wisconsin avenues NW. Free. 202-537-2319.

NAVY MEMORIAL CONCERT, Navy Band Commodores, noon, Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-433-2525.

MONUMENTAL BRASS QUINTET, concert, 12:15-12:45 p.m., National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Cir. NW. Free. 202-232-0323.

AFRICAN WILDLIFE TALK, anthropologist Alden Almquist discusses his research on the preservation of wildlife and biodiversity in Africa, 2:30 p.m., Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-3302.

GUITAR CONCERT, DISCUSSION, guitarists Jorge Strunz of Costa Rica and Ardeshir Farah of Iran discuss their art and perform a fusion of Latin and Middle Eastern music; discussion, 6:30 p.m.; concert, 8 p.m., Freer Gallery of Art, Meyer Auditorium, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. Free. 800-551-7328.

MANSIONS AND MONUMENTS, architect James B. Garrison discusses his book "Mastering Tradition: The Residential Architecture of John Russell Pope," about the man who designed several palatial homes for Washington diplomats and high society members as well as the National Archives, the National Gallery of Art and the Jefferson Memorial, 7 p.m., Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $15; reservations required. 202-965-0400, Ext. 109.

BRAZILIAN POP MUSIC, singer-guitarist Vinicius Cantuaria, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Gallery, 2700 F St. NW. $25. 202-467-4600.

WAGNER AND SUICIDE, Hofstra University English professor John DiGaetani discusses the suicidal theme in the German composer's music, sponsored by Wagner Society, 7:30 p.m., George Washington University, Funger Hall, Room 108, 2201 G St. NW. Free. 301-907-2600.

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON, journalist William Souder discusses his biography "Under a Wild Sky: John James Audubon and the Making of 'The Birds of America'," about the illegitimate son of a French sea captain who became a naturalist and painter of American wildlife in the 1800s, 8 p.m., National Zoological Park, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free; reservations recommended. 202-673-4717 or 202-673-4925.

-- Compiled by GERRI MARMER

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