For the Record

Here's how some major bills fared recently in Congress and how local congressional members voted, as provided by Thomas's Roll Call Syndicate. NV means Not Voting.

House Votes

REPEAL OF D.C. GUN LAWS

For: 250 / Against: 171

The House passed a bill (HR 3193) to repeal the District's gun-control laws. The measure would legalize the possession of handguns, semiautomatic assault weapons and armor-piercing bullets in the federal city. The bill also would repeal registration requirements for firearms and ammunition, remove criminal penalties for possessing unregistered weapons and allow residents to possess loaded firearms at home.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Cardin (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Cummings (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Gilchrest (R)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Hoyer (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Ruppersberger (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Van Hollen (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Wynn (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

EXPANDED HATE-CRIMES LAW

For: 213 / Against: 186

The House urged conferees on the fiscal 2005 defense authorization bill (HR 4200) to accept a Senate-passed expansion of the federal law against hate crimes. The existing law provides federal assistance to states and localities in prosecuting crimes based on the victim's race, religion or national origin. The expansion would add crimes based on sexual orientation, disability and gender.

A yes vote was to expand the federal hate-crimes law.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Cardin (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Cummings (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Gilchrest (R)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Hoyer (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Ruppersberger (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Van Hollen (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Wynn (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

STOPGAP BUDGET

For: 389 / Against: 32

The House approved temporary funding of agencies at fiscal 2004 levels for the start of fiscal 2005, which began Oct. 1. The stopgap budget (HJ Res 107) shifts $3.46 billion from reconstruction to military programs in Iraq. Valid through Nov. 20, the measure is needed because the House and Senate have enacted only one of the 13 required appropriations bills for fiscal 2005, the defense spending measure. Congress plans to return for a lame-duck session in November.

A yes vote was to pass the continuing resolution.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Cardin (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Cummings (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Gilchrest (R)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Hoyer (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Ruppersberger (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Van Hollen (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Wynn (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

DEMOCRATS' PLAN

For: 200 / Against: 221

The House blocked a Democratic motion to increase spending for such programs as military housing, Alzheimer's research, homeland security, FBI counterterrorism activities, veterans' health care and children's health insurance in the stopgap budget (HJ Res 107, above).

A yes vote backed the Democrats' spending increases.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Cardin (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Cummings (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Gilchrest (R)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Hoyer (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Ruppersberger (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Van Hollen (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Wynn (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

BAN ON SAME-SEX MARRIAGE

For: 227 / Against: 186

The House failed to reach the two-thirds majority needed to approve a constitutional amendment (HJ Res 106) to outlaw same-sex marriage. In a July vote, the Senate also rejected the measure. The amendment states: "Marriage in the United States shall consist only of the union of a man and a woman. Neither this Constitution, nor the constitution of any state, shall be construed to require that marriage or the legal incidents thereof be conferred upon any union other than the union of a man and a woman."

A yes vote backed the constitutional amendment.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Cardin (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Cummings (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Gilchrest (R)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Hoyer (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Ruppersberger (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Van Hollen (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Wynn (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Senate Votes

INTELLIGENCE DIRECTOR'S TERM

For: 93 / Against: 4

The Senate killed an amendment to set a 10-year term for the post of national intelligence director, just as the FBI director serves for 10 years. The action occurred during debate on a bill (S 2845) to overhaul the U.S. intelligence community. The bill gives presidents authority to hire and fire the U.S. intelligence chief. The post is subject to Senate confirmation.

A yes vote opposed a set term for the intelligence director.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Mikulski (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Sarbanes (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

BUSINESS-TERRORISM ISSUE

For: 47 / Against: 41

The Senate killed a bid to prevent foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies from doing business with countries such as Iran that are state sponsors of terrorist organizations such as the Islamic Resistance Movement, or Hamas, and Hezbollah. The amendment was offered to an intelligence reorganization bill (S 2845) that was being debated. U.S. economic sanctions ban U.S. companies from doing business with countries designated by the State Department as sponsors of terrorism. A loophole allows overseas subsidiaries of U.S. companies to sell to those countries.

A yes vote was to kill the amendment.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Mikulski (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

Sarbanes (D)

{hbox}

*

{hbox}

SHARED INTELLIGENCE AUTHORITY

For: 78 / Against: 19

The Senate voted to establish shared authority between the national intelligence director and the Department of Defense over three intelligence agencies -- the National Security Agency, National Reconnaissance Office and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency -- run by the Pentagon. This affirmed language in S 2845 (above) that gives the new intelligence chief control over the budgets and personnel of the agencies while leaving the Pentagon with operational control. The vote killed an amendment to give the intelligence director full control of the three agencies.

A yes vote backed shared authority.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Mikulski (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Sarbanes (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

AIR CARGO SAFETY

For: 96 / Against: 0

The Senate voted to address concerns raised by the Sept. 11 commission over air cargo safety. The commission called for much tighter security against "the threat posed by explosives in vessels' cargo holds." Passenger flights carry a large volume of rarely inspected commercial cargo. This amendment to S 2845 (above) would empower the government to revoke the license of shippers and freight forwarders thought to be security risks and encourage foreign countries to conduct better inspections of cargo bound for the United States. It also would require stepped-up screening and training at U.S. airports. These provisions have passed the Senate twice since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks but have died in the House.

A yes vote was to adopt the amendment.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Mikulski (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}

Sarbanes (D)

*

{hbox}

{hbox}