For the Record

Here's how some major bills fared recently in Congress, and how local congressional members voted, as provided by Thomas's Roll Call Syndicate. NV means Not Voting.

House Votes

INTELLIGENCE OVERHAUL

For: 282 / Against: 134

The House passed a bill (HR 10) restructuring the U.S. intelligence community. The bill establishes the post of national intelligence director and a national counterterrorism center to coordinate the work of the 15 U.S. intelligence agencies. Although the bill includes some recommendations of the Sept. 11 commission, it contains immigration and law enforcement provisions not requested by the panel.

The House bill differs from the Senate bill, below, by limiting the budget and personnel authority of the new intelligence director and omitting a watchdog board for civil liberties as well as a requirement for public disclosure of overall intelligence spending.

The House measure also differs by including sections on border control and immigration enforcement.

Only Republicans drafted the House bill, while both parties drafted the Senate measure. The bills were headed for a conference committee.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

*

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Cardin (D)

*

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Cummings (D)

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*

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Gilchrest (R)

*

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Hoyer (D)

*

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Ruppersberger (D)

*

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Van Hollen (D)

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*

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Wynn (D)

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*

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VIRGINIA

Y

N

NV

Cantor (R)

*

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J. Davis (R)

*

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T. Davis (R)

*

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Moran (D)

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*

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Wolf (R)

*

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DEMOCRATIC SUBSTITUTE

For: 203 / Against: 213

The House rejected a Democratic bill to restructure the U.S. intelligence community. The measure was similar to the Senate-passed bill, below, and contained most of the recommendations of the Sept. 11 commission. Compared with the underlying GOP bill (HR 10, above), it gave the national intelligence director stronger budget and personnel powers, included a civil liberties oversight board, omitted law enforcement sections not requested by the Sept. 11 commission and provided public disclosure of the overall sum spent for U.S. intelligence.

A yes vote backed the substitute bill.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

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*

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Cardin (D)

*

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Cummings (D)

*

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Gilchrest (R)

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*

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Hoyer (D)

*

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Ruppersberger (D)

*

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Van Hollen (D)

*

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Wynn (D)

*

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VIRGINIA

Y

N

NV

Cantor (R)

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*

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J. Davis (R)

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*

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T. Davis (R)

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*

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Moran (D)

*

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Wolf (R)

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*

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MILITARY DRAFT

For: 2 / Against: 402

The House defeated a bill (HR 163) to resume the military draft to meet U.S. obligations in Iraq. Sponsored by six Democrats, the bill would require those ages 18 to 26 to serve two years either in the armed forces or civilian service in support of U.S. security.

A yes vote was to revive the draft.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

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*

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Cardin (D)

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*

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Cummings (D)

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*

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Gilchrest (R)

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*

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Hoyer (D)

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*

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Ruppersberger (D)

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*

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Van Hollen (D)

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*

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Wynn (D)

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*

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VIRGINIA

Y

N

NV

Cantor (R)

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*

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J. Davis (R)

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*

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T. Davis (R)

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*

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Moran (D)

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*

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Wolf (R)

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*

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CORPORATE TAX BREAKS

For: 280 / Against: 141

The House approved the conference report on a bill (HR 4520) providing at least $136 billion over 10 years in tax breaks for U.S. corporations. The bill also finances a $10 billion buyout of owners of federal tobacco allotments. The cost would be partially offset by closing tax loopholes but also would increase the national debt.

The bill cuts rates for broadly defined domestic manufacturing activity from 35 percent to 32 percent to offset the loss of export subsidies ruled illegal by the World Trade Organization. In states without an income tax, it allows residents to deduct sales taxes from their federal income taxes.

Among those receiving targeted relief from the bill are Home Depot, NASCAR track owners, Oldsmobile dealers, pharmaceutical companies, railroads, timber companies, liquor distillers, restaurant owners, commodity traders, bank directors, energy firms, ethanol producers, cruise-ship owners and bow-and-arrow makers.

A yes vote was to approve the conference report.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Bartlett (R)

*

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Cardin (D)

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*

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Cummings (D)

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*

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Gilchrest (R)

*

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Hoyer (D)

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*

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Ruppersberger (D)

*

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Van Hollen (D)

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*

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Wynn (D)

*

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VIRGINIA

Y

N

NV

Cantor (R)

*

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J. Davis (R)

*

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T. Davis (R)

*

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Moran (D)

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*

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Wolf (R)

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*

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Senate Votes

INTELLIGENCE OVERHAUL

For: 96 / Against: 2

The Senate passed a bill (S 2845) restructuring the U.S. intelligence community along lines recommended by the Sept. 11 commission. To coordinate the 15 U.S. intelligence agencies, the bill creates the post of national intelligence director and establishes a national counterterrorism center. The intelligence chief, appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate, would have strong budget and personnel control over the 15 agencies but share authority with the Pentagon over certain units.

The bill makes public the total annual intelligence budget and establishes an ombudsman to guard against politicization of intelligence. It creates a civil liberties board, nominated by the president and confirmed by the Senate, to monitor the infringement of intelligence activities on basic freedoms.

Also, the bill establishes the posts of inspector general for national intelligence operations and comptroller for intelligence spending, creates a reserve corps of retired intelligence officers and establishes an agency to conduct security clearances of federal employees and contractors.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Mikulski (D)

*

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Sarbanes (D)

*

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VIRGINIA

Yes

No

NV

Allen (R)

*

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Warner (R)

*

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SPY BUDGET DISCLOSURE

For: 55 / Against: 37

The Senate voted for public disclosure of the total U.S. intelligence budget, now unofficially reported at $40 billion annually. This killed an amendment to strip S 2845 (above) of the disclosure provision and thus keep the aggregate figure a state secret.

A yes vote backed disclosure.

MARYLAND

Y

N

NV

Mikulski (D)

*

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Sarbanes (D)

*

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VIRGINIA

Yes

No

NV

Allen (R)

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*

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Warner (R)

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*

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