The following were among cases handled recently by the Animal Welfare League of Alexandria, which operates the Alexandria Animal Shelter and provides animal control services to Alexandria. For more information or to report emergencies involving animals 24 hours a day, call 703-838-4774.

Lost, Timid Dog Captured

EISENHOWER AVE., 2500 block, Oct. 20. A man reported that he found his missing Chihuahua, which he had adopted two days earlier, but could not catch it. A police detective, who happened to be in the area, coaxed the frightened dog to come to her and returned it to the owner.

Injured Dog in Yard

PRINCESS ST., 1600 block, Oct. 16. Animal control responded to a call about a dog lying in the front yard of a residence with a possible broken hip and took it to an animal hospital.

Arlington

The following were among cases handled recently by the Animal Welfare League of Arlington, which operates the county animal shelter and provides animal control services to Arlington County. The shelter is open for adoptions from noon to 7 p.m. weekdays and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. For more information or to report emergencies involving animals 24 hours a day, call 703-931-9241. The league's Web site is www.awla.org.

Bird Feeder's Security Foiled

DITMAR ST. N., 3500 block, Oct. 26. A man reported that a squirrel was stuck in his bird feeder, which was purported to be "squirrel-proof." When an animal control officer arrived, the animal appeared to be trapped, but when she tapped on the feeder, the squirrel ran away.

Elusive Snake in Basement

MILITARY RD. N., 3500 block, Oct. 27. A woman called animal control several times Oct. 23 and 24 about a snake in her basement. Each time an officer arrived, the snake could not be found. On Oct. 27, an officer found a black snake and released it outside. Black snakes are native to the area, non-venomous and eat rats, according to animal control.

Dog's Microchip No Help With ID

24TH ST. N., 3800 block, Oct. 25. An animal control officer found two strays, a bloodhound and a black terrier mix, both without proper identification, and took them to the county shelter. The next day a woman reported that her bloodhound had been missing since it left her yard to chase a fox. She said that the other dog was not hers. When she claimed the bloodhound, she said it had a microchip ID, which the shelter could not detect with a scanner. Animal control advises residents to provide external identification for their pets because microchips sometimes fail to register when scanned. The terrier mix, a neutered male, was held at the shelter.

-- Compiled by RIA MANGLAPUS