Alexandria

The following were among cases handled recently by the Animal Welfare League of Alexandria, which provides animal control services to the city. For more information or to report emergencies involving animals 24 hours a day, call 703-838-4774 or visit www.alexandriaanimals.org.

Injured Kitten Recovering

EDSALL RD., 5700 block, Aug. 23. A black-and-white kitten that had been hit by a car was taken to the shelter and then to an animal hospital for treatment. It is back at the shelter, recuperating.

Baby Squirrels Retrieved

ARMISTEAD ST. N., 400 block, Aug. 25. Two baby squirrels were picked up from a balcony and taken to the shelter. They were later released to a rehabilitator.

Loose Lab Back Home

RUSSELL RD., 1200 block, Aug. 30. A chocolate Labrador retriever running loose was picked up and taken to the shelter, where it was held as a stray. The owner called the shelter to file a lost-pet report and was soon reunited with his dog.

Calendar Contest

Photo entries are now being accepted for the "2006 Pets of Alexandria Calendar Contest." All kinds of pets are eligible, but their owners must be residents of Alexandria. A pet may be entered only once, and the entry fee is $10 per photo. The deadline for submission is 5 p.m. Sept. 15. The entry form is available at www.alexandriaanimals.org, or call the Animal Welfare League at 703-838-4774.

Arlington

The following was among cases handled recently by the Animal Welfare League of Arlington, which operates the county animal shelter and provides animal control services to Arlington County. The shelter is open for adoptions from noon to 7 p.m. weekdays and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. For more information or to report emergencies involving animals 24 hours a day, call 703-931-9241. The league's Web site is www.awla.org.

Deer Back Where It Belongs

LYNN ST. N., 1900 block, Aug. 27. After a construction worker called to report an adolescent deer running near a busy stretch of Lee Highway, an animal control officer found that the animal had retreated to the bottom of a stairwell. The officer had the worker position a temporary fence from the construction site around the stairwell and determined that the animal was uninjured. Police were told they might be needed to help with traffic control, but that proved unnecessary as the animal control officer was able to get close enough to the deer to safely tranquilize it. The deer was confirmed to be injury-free, and members of the animal control staff consulted a wildlife rehabilitator, who advised that the animal was old enough to survive on its own. It was taken to the edge of some woods near the shelter and, after a glance back at the animal control officer, bounded away.

-- Compiled by RIA MANGLAPUS