Thursday 22

BLUEGRASS AND COUNTRY MUSIC, the Navy Band's Country Current, noon, Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-433-2525.

CLASSICAL RECITAL, the Monumental Brass Quintet, 12:15-12:45 p.m., National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Cir. NW. Free. 202-232-0323.

NATURE SCAVENGER HUNT, for ages 4 and older, a park ranger leads a search for signs of fall, 4 p.m., Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Rd. NW. Free. 202-895-6070.

KENNEDY CONCERT, Ludovic Jolivet's "Forgotten Consciousness," a multimedia performance about two people who value high financial status and social standing, 6 p.m. today and Friday, Grand Foyer, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

CITY HISTORY EXHIBIT OPENING, the D.C. Preservation League hosts an exhibit of historic photographs, advertisements and floor plans in "Celebrating a Century of Wardman Row-House Neighborhoods," featuring the 100-year-old Bloomingdale, Brightwood and Columbia Heights neighborhoods, reception, 6:30-8:30 p.m. today; exhibit continues, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, through Nov. 1, Wilson Building, 1250 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free; reservations requested. 202-783-5144.

BLOGGING DISCUSSION, "Blogging: Free Press for All or Free-for-All?" with Robert Cox, president of the Media Bloggers Association; Bruce Sanford, chairman of the board of the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression at the University of Virginia; Deborah Potter, executive director of NewsLab; and Jay Rosen, New York University journalism professor, 7 p.m., National Archives, Constitution Avenue NW, between Seventh and Ninth streets. Free; reservations required. 202-501-5000.

HISTORY OF CHOCOLATE MAKING, scholar and Colonial Williamsburg Foundation chocolate maker Jim Gay discusses the history of chocolate in early America, a chocolate tasting follows, 7 p.m., Dumbarton House, 2715 Q St. NW. $25; reservations required. 202-337-2288, Ext. 450.

NAVY BAND BRASS QUINTET, 7:30 p.m., Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-433-2525.

EMBASSY CLASSICAL RECITAL, pianist Josef Mayr and cellist Ingrid Wagner-Kraft perform works by Erwin Schulhoff, Beethoven, Wolfram Wagner, Eric Zeisl and Ruth Schonthal, 7:30 p.m.; composer Wolfram Wagner discusses the program, 6:30 p.m., Embassy of Austria, 3524 International Ct. NW. Free; reservations required. 202-895-6776.

Friday 23

GARDEN TOUR, horticulturist Bill McLaughlin leads a tour of the Southern Exposure garden and discusses plants that were used by Native Americans, noon, U.S. Botanic Garden, 245 First St. SW. Free; preregistration required. 202-226-4082.

LATIN MUSIC DOCUMENTARY, "Pasajero: A Journey of Time and Memory" (2004), about a group of Mexican American musicians who perform traditional mariachi music and dance, noon, National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

ART TALK, Diane Arkin discusses "Irving Penn: Platinum Prints," noon Friday and Wednesday, National Gallery of Art, West Building, 600 Constitution Ave. NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

SCULPTOR'S TALK, Jim Sanborn, creator of the "Kryptos" sculpture installed at the CIA, discusses his enigmatic works, 12:30 p.m., Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue and Seventh Street SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

THRILLER FILM, "Looker" (1981), starring Albert Finney, James Coburn and Susan Dey, about a plan to clone fashion models, 7 p.m., Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mary Pickford Theater, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free; reservations recommended. 202-707-5677.

KOREAN HORROR FILM, "A Tale of Two Sisters" (2003), about a spooky old house, a wicked stepmother and two girls who return home from a long convalescence, in Korean with English subtitles, 7 p.m., Freer Gallery of Art, Meyer Auditorium, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

"LEADING LADIES," John Astin and Charlotte Rae star in Ken Ludwig's comedy about mistaken identity and two unemployed Shakespearean actors who are forced to work at a Pennsylvania Moose lodge, opens, 7:30 p.m. Friday; continues 7:30 p.m. Fridays, 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturdays, 2:30 p.m. Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, no matinee Sept. 24 or 25, Ford's Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. Preview performances through Tuesday, $25; other performances, $25-$52. 202-347-4833.

WEATHER LECTURE, meteorologist J. Marshall Shepherd, a deputy project manager of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission, discusses "From the Chicago Heat Wave to Houston Floods: How Cities Affect Weather and Climate," sponsored by the Philosophical Society of Washington, 8:15 p.m., Cosmos Club, John Wesley Powell Auditorium, 2170 Florida Ave. NW. Free. 703-370-5282.

Saturday 24

NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL, for adults and children, appearances by more than 80 authors, illustrators and poets, such as John Irving, Tom Wolfe and David McCullough; plus appearances by costumed book characters, sponsored by the Library of Congress, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., the Mall, between Seventh and 14th streets NW. Free. 888-714-4696 or www.loc.gov/bookfest.

ROCK CREEK PARK DAY, 115th birthday celebration, includes songs and stories about the park's history and ecology, a planetarium show, a live reptile and raptor display and a bike tour to a Civil War site, 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Rock Creek Park, nature center, 5200 Glover Rd. NW. Free. 202-895-6070.

HISPANIC GENEALOGY WORKSHOP, George Ryskamp of Brigham Young University and archivists Kenneth Heger, Reginald Washington and Claire Kluskens discuss the primary and second sources available on the Internet for researching family histories, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m., National Archives, Constitution Avenue NW, between Seventh and Ninth streets. $25; reservations required. 202-208-0781, Ext. 254.

RUG TALK, Richard Isaacson discusses "Door Rugs from Central Asia," 10:30 a.m., Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. Free. 202-667-0441.

ART TALK, New York Times art critic Michael Kimmelman discusses "The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa," noon, National Gallery of Art, East Building Auditorium, 600 Constitution Ave. NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

KIDS ASIAN ART PROGRAM, for children 6-14 accompanied by an adult, a museum staff member discusses black-and-white decoration in Chinese ceramics and helps children design a picture to take home, 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 16, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, classroom, 1050 Independence Ave. SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

NATIVE AMERICAN POETRY READINGS, Sherwin Bitsui, Duncan Primeaux and others read and discuss their poems, a reception follows, 3 p.m., National Museum of the American Indian, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Sunday 25

LATIN FOOD FESTIVAL, museum staff members and scientists distribute recipes, discuss the history and biology of corn, beans, avocado, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes and cacao, lead hands-on activities and tastings and tell stories in English and Spanish, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

AFRICAN DOCUMENTARY, "Becoming a Woman in Okrika" (1990), for adults, about the Niger Delta village coming-of-age ceremony for females, in Igbo with English subtitles, 1 p.m., National Museum of African Art, 950 Independence Ave. SW. Free. 202-633-4600.

CATHEDRAL GARGOYLE TOUR, for ages 10 and older, a docent leads a tour of humorous and scary gargoyles and discusses the difference between a gargoyle and a grotesque, bring binoculars, 2 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Massachusetts and Wisconsin avenues NW. $5. 202-537-6200.

FREDERICK DOUGLASS TALK, park ranger Paul Gross discusses the history and achievements of the civil rights pioneer as they related to his family life, 2 p.m., Frederick Douglass National Historic Site Visitor Center, 1411 W St. SE. Free. 202-426-5961.

KOREAN COMEDY FILM, Jang Jin's "Someone Special" (2004), about a lovesick baseball player and the strange woman who loves him, in Korean with English subtitles, 2 p.m., Freer Gallery of Art, Meyer Auditorium, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

AFRICAN ART TALK, curator Andrea Nicolls discusses "Where Gods and Mortals Meet: Continuity and Renewal in Urhobo Art," about the role of art among the Nigerian people, 2 p.m., National Museum of African Art, 950 Independence Ave. SW. Free. 202-633-4600.

SYRIAN MUSIC, the band Hewar performs music that blends Arabic, jazz, scat, opera and classical styles, 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Monday 26

SENIORS WORKFORCE FORUM, representatives from the Washington Board of Trade and area businesses discuss "Staying Ahead of the Curve: Business Solutions for Greater Washington Employers," about the business community's need to adapt to an aging workforce, 10 a.m.-noon, George Washington University, Marvin Theatre, 800 21st St. NW. Free; preregistration required. 202-434-7703.

ART LECTURE, scholar Pamela Betts discusses "Investigating Francois Clouet's 'A Lady in Her Bath' " 12:10 and 1:10 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building, 600 Constitution Ave. NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

AUTHOR'S TALK, Hugh Nissenson discusses his novel "The Days of Awe," about a Manhattan book illustrator's experience with the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001, 6:30 p.m., Chevy Chase branch library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-0021.

Tuesday 27

PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT RECEPTION, "Portraits From the Pike: A Celebration of Community," works produced by teenagers involved in the Columbia Heights West Teen Photo Project at the Arlington Mill Community Center, reception and artists talk, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday; exhibit continues, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, 12:30-5 p.m. Sundays, through Oct. 14, Washington Theological Union, 6896 Laurel St. NW. Free. 202-726-8800.

POETRY, poets Kwame Alexander, Patricia Clark and Kim Roberts read works with the theme "Singing the Body Electric," noon, Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mary Pickford Theater, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-1308.

VIOLA RECITAL, Will Hurd, 12:10 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 13th and G streets NW. Free. 202-347-2635, Ext. 18.

SCULPTURE GARDEN ART, Sally Shelburne and sculpture garden horticulturist James Kaufmann discuss the choices of plantings for the gallery's Sculpture Garden, 1 p.m., National Gallery of Art, Sculpture Garden Pavilion, 600 Constitution Ave. NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

FARM WORKERS LABOR TALK, discussion of the organization of Mexican American and Filipino farm workers in California from 1965 to 1970 and the creation of the United Farm Workers of America; discussion panelists include Dolores Huerta, who was a work associate of Cesar Chavez; Andy Imutan, a Filipino labor leader; Luis Valdez, founder of Teatro Campesino; and U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.), 6-8 p.m., National Museum of American History, Carmichael Auditorium, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

MUSIC FROM MALI, singer, guitarist and composer Boubacar Traore, 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

NAVAJO WEAVINGS, Nancy Blomberg, curator of Native Arts at the Denver Art Museum, discusses the distinctive designs and colorful styles of these textiles, 6:30 p.m., Smithsonian, S.D. Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $30. 202-357-3030.

SINGING WORKSHOP, "Building a Vocal Community: Singing in the African American Tradition," led by Ysaye Barnwell of the a cappella group Sweet Honey in the Rock, 7-9:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, First Congregational United Church of Christ, 945 G St. NW. $10 suggested donation. 202-628-4317.

ARCHITECTURE LECTURE, Cynthia Field of the Smithsonian Institution's Architectural History division discusses "Adolf Cluss, German-American Architect: Redefining the Civic Architecture and Cityscape of Our Nation's Capital," co-sponsored by the Latrobe Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, 7 p.m.; reception with German cuisine, 6 p.m., Charles Sumner School, 1201 17th St. NW. $12; students, $8; reservations required. 202-442-6060.

NAPOLEON EXHIBIT LECTURE, Pierre-Jean Chalencon, a Napoleon artifacts collector, discusses his pieces on display in the exhibit "Napoleon: An Intimate Portrait" and how they reflect the man and the age in which he lived; a tour of the exhibit follows, 7:30 p.m., National Geographic Society, 17th and M streets NW. $17. 202-857-7700.

HEDY LAMARR DOCUMENTARY, "Calling Hedy Lamarr" (2004), about the glamorous Hollywood star and co-inventor of a secret communication system for Navy torpedoes, 8 p.m., Embassy of Austria, 3524 International Ct. NW. Free; reservations required. 202-895-6776.

Wednesday 28

ISLAMIC HERITAGE LECTURE, Cornelia Bailey, from Sapelo Island, Ga., discusses the customs, traditions and Islamic heritage of the Gullah people, 10:30 a.m., Anacostia Museum, 1901 Fort Pl. SE. Free; reservations recommended. 202-633-1000.

HERBS LECTURE, Holly H. Shimizu, executive director of the U.S. Botanic Garden, discusses "Herbs in the Garden," 11:30 a.m., Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mumford Room, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-5664.

NAVY BAND CONTEMPORARY MUSIC, concert by the Cruisers ensemble, noon, Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-433-2525.

LITHOGRAPHY LECTURE, a museum staff member discusses the invention of the art and lithography by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard, 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, East Building Auditorium, and 10:30 a.m. Oct. 1, West Building Lecture Hall, National Gallery of Art, 600 Constitution Ave. NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE, novelist Louise Erdrich reads from her new work "The Painted Drum," 6:30 p.m., National Museum of the American Indian, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

OTTOMAN PALACE, Walter B. Denny, a University of Massachusetts history professor, discusses what life was like at the Topkapi palace, 6:30 p.m., Smithsonian, S.D. Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $30. 202-357-3030.

"FORBIDDEN LOVES" TALK, Patricia Daly-Lipe discusses her book "Forbidden Loves: Paris Between the Wars," about life in Paris between World War I and World War II, 6:30 p.m., Alliance Francaise, 2142 Wyoming Ave. NW. $8. 202-234-7911.

"FLAXY MARTIN," 1949 film noir starring Zachary Scott, Dorothy Malone, Virginia Mayo and Elisha Cook Jr., about a mafia lawyer who wants to break his criminal ties but is outsmarted by a gorgeous blonde; plus a cartoon, 7 p.m., Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 Seventh St. SE. $5. 202-547-6839.

ARTIST'S TALK, painter James Rosenquist discusses his works and how he combines images from advertising and mass media with vibrant color and abstraction, a reception follows, 7 p.m., Renwick Gallery, 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

CLASSICAL RECITAL, violinist Wanchi Huang and pianist Gabriel Dobner perform works by J.S. Bach, Prokofiev and others, 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $25. 202-467-4600.

Thursday 29

RED HOT SALSA POETRY READINGS, in conjunction with Hispanic Heritage Month, noon, Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mary Pickford Theater, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-5479.

ACOUSTIC SWING MUSIC, concert by the Ridgetop Syncopators, 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, South Plaza, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

PIANO DUO RECITAL, Silver-Garburg duo, 6:30 p.m., Inter-American Development Bank Cultural Center, 1300 New York Ave. NW. Free; photo identification required. 202-623-3558.

SLAVERY ABOLITION TALK, historian C.R. Gibbs discusses "Freedom Rising: The Abolition of Slavery in the Western Hemisphere," 7 p.m., Lamond-Riggs branch library, 5401 South Dakota Ave. NE. Free. 202-541-6255.

-- Compiled by GERRI MARMER

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