From remarks in the Senate by Majority Leader Robert Byrd (D-W. Va.) on May 26, as recorded in the Congressional Record:

This brings to mind a story that I read in yesterday's great Washington afternoon paper, the Evening Star, which said Washington people were going to get tired of Senator Byrd's renditons of "Rye Whisky" and "The Cumberland Gap."

Well, for the benefit of that distinguished and able reporter, those two tunes do not constitute my total repertoire. The next time, I hope that gentleman will just walk up to me when I have the violin, so that I will know he is present, and I will dedicate to him Arthur Smith's number, "Listen to the Mockingbird," or I will play for him "Sally"; or "Will the Circle Be Broken?" or President Carter's favorite selection, "Amazing Grace"; or that old fiddling tune called the "Forked Deer"; or the "Mississippi Sawyer"; or "Soldier's Joy"; or the Arkansas Traveler"; or "old Joe Clark"; or "Fire in the Mountain"; or the "Black Mountain Rag"; or "Billy in the Low Ground"; or "Chicken Reel"; or "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"; or "When You and I were Young, Maggie"; or the "Old Time Religion"; or the "Roving Gambler"; or "Cottoneyed Joe"; or the Waltz, "Over the Waves."

I could go on, and I could just fiddle on and on and on and on . . .

Let me say further that I always carry my fiddle with me - or almost always - but I never take it into a crowd unless I am invited to do so, and when they invited me to come, I play what I want to play . . .