A sociologist's survey of volunteer soldiers at Ft. Sill, Okla., shows women soldiers are happier than men, and black volunteers are more qualified than white, but that all are lacking in confidence. "They didn't feel very confident to wage war and were less confident of the people around them," University of Houston sociologist Dr. David Gottlieb said of 115 volunteer enlistees he questioned at Ft. Sill. "The young women tend to be older, better educated and more stable," he said Monday. "It's tougher for women to join the service. They have to withstand a lot of social pressure. It takes a certain level of courage and commitment. They do it to get some sense of independence." Gottlieb said the Army probably is the only institution where the blacks hired for lower-ranking jobs average more education and mental ability than the whites. "In fact, we are probably drawing a higher cut of black youth than white youth in enlisted personnel," he said. "In fact, we are probably drawning a higher cut of black youth than white youth in enlisted personnel," he said. But he said blacks still tend to end up in the more physical, less mental combat-type jobs, adding, "I don't know if it is the result of discrimination or just some maintenance of the old traidition." Gottlieb's survey was funded by the Army Research Institute. He emphasized it might not represent opinion throughout the Army, but said he built a survey model intended to reflect the Army's makeup.