In the course of two days the week before last, both Alexander Haig and Menachem Begin granted separate interviews to Trude Feldman, Washington correspondent for an international group of Jewish newspapers. This was apparently Haig's last interview before he resigned as secretary of state, and Begin's only newspaper interview during his visit to this country.

Feldman had the foresight to ask Begin how he would feel if Haig left office (as he did three days later), a question that surprised the Israeli prime minister, who gave Haig an eloquent testimonial. She questoned Haig about his attitude toward Begin, which produced another testimonial. Haig also offered views on the war in Lebanon that showed his sympathy for Israeli objectives there, a position that apparently put him at odds with White House officials. The edited excerpts of these two interviews reveal an unusual bond between statesmen of two different countries.

In the course of two days the week before last, both Alexander Haig and Menachem Begin granted spearate interviews to Trude Feldman, Washington correspondent for an international group of Jewish newspapers. This was apparently Haig's last interview before he resigned as secretary of state, and Begin's only newspaper interview during his visit to this country.

Feldman had the foresight to ask Begin how he would feel if Haig left office (as he did three days later), a question that surprised the Israeli prime minister, who gave Haig an eloquent testimonial. She questoned Haig about his attitude toward Begin, which produced another testimonial. Haig also offered views on the war in Lebanon that showed his sympathy for Israeli objectives there, a position that apparently put him at odds with White House officials. The edited excerpts of these two interviews reveal an unusual bond between statesmen of two different countries.

Q: How are your relations with the secretary?

A: When we first met in Israel (in July, 1974, during a visit to Israel by then-President Nixon) we sat together at the same table and talked for close to three hours. From then, I drew the conclusion that Mr. Haig is a great patriot, a man who loves freedom, a man who will always defend liberty. And, when he became secretary of state, a very warm personal rapport was established between us. . . . Israel does not have a better friend in the U.S. Or in any other country.

Q: What kind of diplomat is he?

A: Let me give you one example. When our ambassador to Great Britain, Shlomo Argov, was shot down on that street in London, I received from Mr. Haig one of the most beautiful, moving letters I've ever read. The ambassador and the secretary became close friends over the years and had a mutual respect.

Q:FA: How would Israel feel if the secretary of state leaves his post?

A: Oh, that isn't for me to decide. But for Israel it would be a real tragedy -- not only for us, but for all free countries. He is an intelligent and knowledgeable statesman. If he would leave such a responsible post, it would create great worry in our hearts.

Q: Do you recall that September day in 1981 when an emergency meeting between you and Secretary Haig was kept so secretive when he flew to Kennedy Airport in New York before you departed for Israel? Can you now disclose what you discussed/

A: Yes, Secretary Haig then came to brief me on the latest developments on the debate in Congress over the Reagan administration's decision to sell AWAC radar planes and F15 enhancements to Saudi Arabia.

You know, that consisted of a serious dispute that generated unsympathetic debate. I particularly regretted the use by supporters of the AWACS dale of the slogan, "Begin or Reagan," because I am not in competition with President Reagan. That was a bitter, hurtful slogan to us. It was meant, I think, to force American Jews and millions of Christian friends to choose between being loyal to the president of the United States and supporting the prime minister of Israel. But I think President Reagan and Secretary Haig understood our point of view and we understood theirs. I might add, however, that the AWACS sale was a mistake. Saudi Arabia did not become more "moderate," as some U.S. senators thought it would. On the contrary, the Saudi regmine is one of the most radical in the Mideast -- fantically anti-Israel and the paymaster of the so-called PLO.

Q: Would you ever consider talking directly with PLO leader Yasser Arafat?

A: Why should I talk to a man like Arafat? If he had the power and strength to destroy each one of the 31/2 million Jews now living in Israel, he would do so. Now he had to look for asylum, and he is not in a good situation. I think his organization is -- if not completely paralyzed -- very much weakened by our action in Lebanon.

Q: Will Israel help rebuild Lebanon?

A: We very much want to help rebuild Lebanon. the task has already begun with the appointment of one of my closest associates, Yaakov Meridor. He is charged with the responsibility for working with the Lebanese people and helping them to rehabilitate their cities and towns.

Q: When will you withdraw from Lebanon?

A: Israel doesn't want to keep its troops in Lebanon a minute longer than necessary. Lebanon is not the land of Israel. It is a sovereign foreign country. We want an independent Lebanon whose borders we will respect. We want to sign a peace treaty with Lebanon on the basis of its territorial integrity. We are prepared to leave Lebanon today, tomorrow, anytime soon. We want our soldiers back home. But as President Reagan recently told the British Parliament, the scourge of terrorism in the Mideast must be stamped out. We will not leave Lebanon until the lives of our children are no longer threatened. We must be sure that security arrangements are so organized that no gun, no rocke will hit our towns and villages. When these arrangements are completed, we will say "goodye" to Lebanon -- but not before.

Q: How did the incursion into Lebanon change the Middle East scene?

A: We have not changed the situation. What we did do was to hit very hard the PLO. In fact, The Free World does not realize what Israel did for it when we entered Lebanon and smashed the PLO. Lebanon had actually become a Soviet base, from which the PLO would take over Jordan, Saudi Arabia and other places. We were ourselves astonished at the huge supply of Russian weapons discovered when we entered the Lebanese town of Sidon. It will take hundreds of heavy trucks many weeks to take out all the Soviet arms concentrated in Lebanon.