Georgetown fulfills a very stong need in the Washington area. It is one of the few examples in this country of a kind of European central urban neighborhood. There is a human scale. It is a place people go for people-watching as well as for entertainment and it has a certain comfort, size, understandability, what we planners call "legibility." It has a balance -- commercial and residential; it's not all office buildings, it's not all this, it's not all that. It is really the antithesis of what most of America is. There is a combination of charm and urbanity.

When Georgetown was renewed, it was very successful because people discovered the kind of charm and authenticity of the place. It became more and more popular and then when it became more and more popular, it became a place to have commercial entertainment. People came because there were people there. . . . There's no place to go and hang out in Potomac, Md.

I recall back in the '60s when we had great swarms of people coming in from West Virginia and wearing T-shirts and going to places like the Crazy Horse Saloon where they would drink a lot of beer and then beat everybody up. It wasn't wonderful. There was quite a lot of aggravation then. . . .

People are treating this situation as a new phenomenon. It's not a sudden phenomenon; it's been around for a long time. From the earliest days of L'Enfant and George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, they were sitting in Georgetown drinking beer just because it was a nice place to be. . . .