I think everybody owns Georgetown, everybody in the United States. It's part of the nation's capital. But that puts a certain burden on the city -- the residents and the business people here -- to try and operate something that the nation can be proud of. . . .

(The residents) started to lose control. Over the past couple of years Georgetown has become an incredibly popular place to go, not only for tourists but for an awful lot of kids and grown-ups as well. What was happening is that Georgetown -- as an 18th-or 19th-century village, its physical plant -- just couldn't accommodate the huge crowds of people. The crowds were getting to the point that they were overwhelming. . . .

Now, I think we're moving in the right direction. . . . We've got an administration that recognizes that we have a problem. I think we've got a business community that recognizes that we have a problem and the homeowners have always thought that we've had a problem. For once we're all talking about the same problem. Even the developers and some of the larger developers who've been here a while -- Western Development, to take the most obvious example -- they've got a vested interest in this community. Not only do a lot of their top people live here, but they've got millions of dollars in real estate invested here. They don't want to see that ruined any more than the residents do. . . .

When you're sitting here like we were a year ago and you've got the Gross National Parade followed by the Great American Chile Cookoff followed by New Year's Eve, Redskins, Hoyas -- any excuse to have a party meant that you could come trash Georgetown with 40,000 people. . . . That's crazy. . . .

I live here, and I know all kinds of people when I walk down the street, and I love it here. . . . (The story used to be) if your kids went down to Doc's and were looking at the grown-up magazines, you'd hear about it the next day. There's still some of that that goes on, but it's a much bigger village.

You can't own something like Georgetown anymore. It's too big.