*I hesitate to be so extreme as to say satellite dishes should be banned. . . But we have to be careful in these monumental areas. We can't start defacing our public spaces. Our track record as a nation is pretty sorry -- especially when you think about telegraph wires and poles and the oubreak of signs. I hope this country has grown up since then. We should prize our man-made environment. . . .

I live in a historic district in Georgetown and I must say the value of that part of town, which is protected, would be severely threatened by a proliferation of these things.

It's a bottom-line world, and the pressure of people who make and sell them is stronger than that of the people who object. J.carter Brown Director, National Gallery of Srts.

*Personally, I would be very disturbed if my next-door neighbor stuck one up in front of his house. It is a public issue when it is in a public space.te them where they're not all that visible, or screen them with landscaping. -- Charles Atherton, Secretary, Fine Arts Commission

*We -- my architecture firm -- have come to terms with them. They can be painted black and you can put bushes around them. But it's a rude thing to put them on top of an existing building. Look at the Dupont Circle Building. The satellite dish sits precariously on the edge of a 1950s box. It's an assault to our eyes. . . .

If a neighbor of mine put one up, I'd lobby for cable, call the mayor. I don't know anyone who wants 64 channels anyway. The seven I get are all terrible. -- Hugh Jacobsen, Washington architect