From testimony April 29 before the House Subcommittee on Government Relations by Rep. Robert Matsui(D-Cal.) on legislation which would compensate Japanese-Americans interned by the U.S. government during World War II:

My grandparents came from Japan; they came in the 1890's. So we really were American citizens when this happened, and we were loyal American citizens as well. My father started his own business with his brother. They had a little produce business on 16th and North B Street in Sacramento. . . .

About two years before I was born, my mother and father bought a house, put a down payment, and were making monthly payments on that house. My father purchased an automobile, they purchased household furniture. . . .

My father and mother told me just recently about what happened when that executive order was given by President Roosevelt. They said that people came to their door and knocked on their door in the late afternoon, early evening, and said, "We know you're going to have to leave Sacramento, and so we'll give you $5 or $10 for your refrigerator, for your sofa, for your beds, because we know you can't take it with you, and you might as well take this money because, after all, if you don't, it's going to sit here and someone will take it from you."

So they sold their cars and their personal effects for virtually nothing. They quitclaimed their house for $50. . . .We didn't know what charges were placed against us, we didn't have a trial, we didn't go before a magistrate or a judge, and here we were, American citizens, and we were taken from our community, our friends, and our home, mainly because of the fact that we were Americans of Japanese ancestry.