From remarks before the Senate Oct. 7 by Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.):

Mr. President, I send an amendment to the desk . . . :

"It is the sense of the Senate that the Department of State, in arranging visits of foreign dignitaries to the Capitol, shall have in mind that ours is a republican institution which by long established practice, and as a matter of principle, conducts its affairs with a minimum of display. Individual senators do not have official cars, do not have motorcycle escorts, do not have praetorian guards. The recurrent spectacle of screeching, self-important, heavily armed caravans of limousines, some 'decoys,' bearing foreign visitors is discordant, disruptive and scarcely a service to the visitors themselves. The Department of State is urged to consider that two unadorned automobiles . . . would ensure foreign visitors a warm welcome, and make clear to them that they are visiting the representative body of a democratic state, and not some besieged citadel of a fearful tyranny."

. . . I do not like, and I cannot think others do, the impression that we are somehow emulating the manner of other nations where rulers roar down the streets, traffic is cleared, and passers-by are scrutinized for whatever unhappy intent they might well indeed have. . . .

{The other day} the president of Mozambique arrived here in a manner which Mr. Duvalier would have found excessive as he roared through Port-au-Prince. Indeed, that president enjoyed such treatment as any dozens of tyrants or dictators in the world are accustomed to. . . .

I would hope that the State Department would hear us saying: Bring them up, but have them arrive the way we arrive.