From a speech by Dwight M. Ellis, vice president for minority and special services, National Association of Broadcasters, to the D.C. Chamber of Commerce Dec. 10:

The D.C.-based Population Reference Bureau tells us that the Washington area has about 22 businesses per 1,000 black residents, ranking our city fourth behind Los Angeles, San Francisco and Houston. It sounds good, but there's a problem with the viability of black businesses. While blacks represent 12 percent of the population, black-owned businesses account for only 0.16 percent of all {U.S.} business revenue . . . and only one black-owned business in the Washington area is among the top 50 companies in Black Enterprise magazine's list of the top 100 black-owned firms of 1987. . . .

Thanks to the accomplishments of many before us and the gains of the civil rights movements, blacks have enjoyed impressive political progress, greater than other minority groups. But all this political muscle has not translated into comparable financial clout. Black Americans have come so far to find that the real color of freedom is green. . . .

To be sure, the undeniable changes, both social and economic, local, national and global, can produce profits for the aggressive, creative, entrepreneurial, sophisticated and determined among us.

As the axis of global economic power is shifting into new alignments, so are new minority business leaders beginning to emerge with greater vigor and playing for higher stakes. . . .

And as long as the business community has the support of progressive financial institutions like Citicorp and Riggs National Bank . . . there is cause for fresh optimism. . . .

Blacks and other minorities in this country deserve the right to opportunities for success or failure, to pursue the "real color of freedom," here or abroad.