From remarks in the Senate by Bill Bradley (D-N.J.) on Feb. 4:

On Oct. 8, 1987, I rose to join the senator from Oregon {Bob Packwood} in introducing a joint resolution to designate Feb. 4, 1988, as "National Women in Sports Day." That day has arrived. It is much overdue.

Although the history of women in sports is rich and long, there has been little national recognition of the significance of women's athletic achievements. Over the last 15 years, several women athletes in our country have emerged as international figures. Their talents, determination and dedication serve as an example for all Americans. . . .

Today, over 10,000 women attend college on athletic scholarships. Women represent 30 percent of all college athletes, yet the athletic opportunities available to male students at collegiate and high school levels remain significantly greater than those for female students. . . .

Over the last decade, there has been a decline in the number of women in athletic leadership positions of coaches, officials and administrators. Women need to be restored to these positions in order to ensure equitable representation of women's abilities and to provide role models for young female athletes.

Athletic fitness contributes to emotional as well as physical health. Women's athletics is one of the most effective avenues available through which women of America may develop self-discipline, initiative and confidence, as well as acquire leadership, communication and cooperation skills. The bonds built between women through athletics help to break down social barriers of racism and prejudice. The positive effects of participation in athletics are bound to carry over to the athlete's contribution at home, at work and to society.