In his Close to Home piece {June 10} John C. Corbin complains mightily about Congress' high-handedness in taking away the District's light rail trolley system. He notes that "the people of Washington have had very little to say in selecting their public transportation."

Mr. Corbin should not have been so exclusive. Many residents of the Washington metropolitan region have had equally little to say in selecting the amount of airport noise and pollution to which they will be subjected. With airplanes as with trolleys, to quote Mr. Corbin again, "the Almighty Congress taketh away and giveth."

In the case of National Airport, Congress has given us a lot that we don't want, and it hasn't taken away anything. In creating the Washington Metropolitan Airports Authority, Congress appears to have been more concerned about preserving its parking perquisites at National than about noise levels in the community where National is situated.

Congress has no constitutional or God-given authority to have its own airport located within "spittin' distance" of its offices, but it acts as if it did. The airport's governing authority, established by Congress, should not have excluded the elected representatives of our local governments, but it does. The airport's so-called Congressional Oversight Committee should not exclude congressional representation from the Washington metropolitan region, but it does. Clearly, Congress could not allow any semblance of representative government where parking privileges were concerned.

The result: an authority that is arrogant toward the region's local residents; an authority that, despite the reasonable demands of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, now has authorized 24-hour-a-day flight operations (even though there probably isn't much business traffic between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.); an authority that proposes various steps to obtain noise reduction and then says it will not enforce those steps.

Maybe trolleys and airports are two good reasons why we really should have a constitutional convention -- to get Congress completely out of local government in this area and let us run our own show the way it should be run. Congress sure can't do the job.

WILLIAM B. MILLER

Alexandria