From an article by Manning Marable in The Progressive (August):

We have reached the end of a long, historical phase of the black political experience in America. Well-worn political assumptions no longer are effective or meaningful. Even Jesse Jackson's unprecedented electoral mobilizations of 1984 and 1988 seem slightly anachronistic when compared to the elections of Douglas Wilder as governor of Virginia and David Dinkins as mayor of New York. There is an awareness that the system of institutionalized racism has changed in the past two decades, but civil-rights leaders have failed to alter their general strategy ...

The black movement's disarray and apparent fragmentation stem from the convergence of three great crises, which it has failed to address comprehensively -- the crisis of ideology, the crisis of politics and the crisis of consciousness or historical imagination.

These three great crises have not been addressed by black politicians, civil-rights officials and other leaders of black society because this elite is a prisoner of its own historic successes. Its finest triumph, the dismantling of the system of legal segregation and the selective integration of minorities into the political mainstream of American society, has proved to be its last hurrah on the national stage. ...

The ideological transformation of the party system is largely responsible for the small but growning cohort of "post-black politicians" -- elected officials, recruited largely from the professional classes, who are racially and ethnically "black" but who favor programs with little kinship to the traditional agendas of the civil-rights movement. One prominent example is Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder, who is already being touted as a possible candidate for vice president in 1992 or 1996.