From an address by Attorney General Dick Thornburgh to the Business Week Annual Symposium on the Americans with Disabilities Act, Oct. 12:

Last Wednesday I invited 12 White House Fellows to lunch. A formidable group of public-spirited men and women, let me tell you. ... The man in charge of our round table that day was our White House Fellow, Drew Batavia, ... an expert on productivity. ...

At age 16, Drew incurred an injury. When thrown from the back seat of a crashing automobile through its windshield, he woke up with only the use of his neck, mouth, other parts of his face and head -- including a very remarkable brain. ...

At age 33 today, he is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Stanford Medical School's public health program -- the author of three books and over 30 scholarly articles.

When you go into Drew's office ... you are likely to find him tapping away at a computer keyboard with his mouth-stick. ... His computer and reading stands are up on tables, raised to a level high enough to accommodate his wheelchair. At first glance, it looks ... expensive. But as Drew points out ... how much more does it cost to add a little height to the table legs? How much extra for a few wooden reading stands?

That's his subject: how you can actually raise productivity by hiring Americans with disabilities. But what I like even more is Drew's symbol. ... It is a knock-off of a famous Picasso print, showing Don Quixote charging the windmills. Everything in the print is the same -- the hot sun, the spear, the knight's chamber-pot hat, the windmill -- except for one small detail. Don Quixote is not astride a gallant steed. Don Quixote is mounted on a wheelchair.