From a press briefing Monday by Gen. Barry McCaffrey, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy:

There must be an independent drug testing agency [for Olympic athletes]. . . . Those who are involved in organizing and promoting the sport lack credibility in testing and sanctioning their own superstars. . . .

We also said you must have year-round vulnerability to testing. . . . And there's been a lot of discussion on this: "Well, how much money," and "the crushing burden." It's our own view money is not the issue. We're running drug-testing programs right now in the United States with 9 million transportation workers, with 1.5 million women and men in the Armed Forces.

When you're talking drug testing for an Olympic competition, there literally aren't a hundred people on the face of the earth who might win a gold medal in diving on the three-meter board. And we know their names; we have known them for 10 years. And we are also, it seems to me, prepared to use far more sophisticated drug-testing systems with a hundred potential gold-medal winners than we are with 9 million transportation workers. . . .

[And] you have got to preserve samples. . . . What you are really trying to do is not catch cheaters but create a system where you deter drug abuse, so that athletes, who are almost universally behind us on this whole issue, can compete based on talent. . . .

And if five years from now you are discovered through new science to have been cheating, we would strip you of your honors.